An appreciation of something that hasn’t vanished yet in NYC — the farmhouse at 121 Charles Street. Am hoping that this won’t be razed soon, or ever, to make way for another soulless glass condo.
from Maeve Brennan’s The Farmhouse That Moved Downtown:


"It was up in the air, a ghost shape, at the end of the block, on the northeast corner of Charles Street and Greenwich Street. The eastern wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall, facing Charles Street is white, and as I approached it I got a sidewise glimmer of it that defined the whole tiny structure. It was a very tiny house — much smaller than I had expected. That must have been a very small farmer who built it. It was sitting up high on a sturdy cage, or raft, of heavy wooden beams, on a wedge-shaped, weedy lot, with the old brick warehouses towering over it like burly nurse-maids. It was a crooked little house — askew on its perch but crooked anyway — and it looked as plain and as insubstantial as a child’s chalk drawing, but it was a real house, with real windows and a real odor, and a flat roof with a chimney sticking out of it. … It is a very private place, with those big walls to the north and east, and with warehouses across both streets, Charles and Greenwich, but I saw domestic lights in the tall windows of the house diagonally across from the farmhouse, on Greenwich Street, and there are people living in the houses going back toward Hudson Street, so it is not deserted there at night or during the weekends. The house could hardly have found a better place to settle in.”


(photos via NYDP. more pics of the farmhouse here, not here, but also here)

An appreciation of something that hasn’t vanished yet in NYC — the farmhouse at 121 Charles Street. Am hoping that this won’t be razed soon, or ever, to make way for another soulless glass condo.

from Maeve Brennan’s The Farmhouse That Moved Downtown:

"It was up in the air, a ghost shape, at the end of the block, on the northeast corner of Charles Street and Greenwich Street. The eastern wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall, facing Charles Street is white, and as I approached it I got a sidewise glimmer of it that defined the whole tiny structure. It was a very tiny house — much smaller than I had expected. That must have been a very small farmer who built it. It was sitting up high on a sturdy cage, or raft, of heavy wooden beams, on a wedge-shaped, weedy lot, with the old brick warehouses towering over it like burly nurse-maids. It was a crooked little house — askew on its perch but crooked anyway — and it looked as plain and as insubstantial as a child’s chalk drawing, but it was a real house, with real windows and a real odor, and a flat roof with a chimney sticking out of it. … It is a very private place, with those big walls to the north and east, and with warehouses across both streets, Charles and Greenwich, but I saw domestic lights in the tall windows of the house diagonally across from the farmhouse, on Greenwich Street, and there are people living in the houses going back toward Hudson Street, so it is not deserted there at night or during the weekends. The house could hardly have found a better place to settle in.”

(photos via NYDP. more pics of the farmhouse here, not here, but also here)

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