On Christian Marclay’s “The Clock”
Both The New Yorker  — “a masterpiece, in its way, it’s not always serious: this is a crowd-pleaser…It’s a funny film: a collage that’s also a kind of Duchampian ready-made.” — and The New York Times — “It is hard to walk out of Mr. Marclay’s loop because inside it you are protected from the dreadful inevitability of endings” — recently reviewed this installation/film; both say it’s worth seeing. However, neither mentioned if the whole film, all 24 hours of it, is worth seeing, or how the film or the experience differs from seeing it from a different time of day.
VeblenesqueGorge recently saw this at pre-dawn:

There was also somewhat more fascination in seeing what film characters were up to at four in the morning than four in the afternoon. …
Watching The Clock, though, you find yourself anticipating the changes in the day as they are refracted through the film clips. How is what people get up to at 4am different than at 5am?

Anyway, this is my weekend plan. Will be watching this in four 6-hour[ishes] shifts: Fri., 12am-6am; Sat., 12pm-6pm; Sun., 6am-12pm; and Tues. (or some weeknight next week), 6pm-12am.

It’ll be a doozy.
The Clock is showing at the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center (Broadway, between 62nd & 63rd sts.). Admission is free.
It runs from 8:00 am – 10:00 pm, Tuesday through Thursday, and then continuously from 8:00 am Friday through 10:00 pm Sunday. It’s closed on Mondays. Now through Aug. 1. Check @LCAtrium twitter feed for line updates.

UPDATE: Saw all 24 hours of The Clock, and it.is.worth.it . But even a few hours of seeing this installation/film is worth it.
If you missed it at Lincoln Center, Christian Marclay’s The Clock will be showing next winter at The Frick Collection. Dates and times TBD.
MOMA has also acquired it and will be showing it there soon.

On Christian Marclay’s “The Clock”

Both The New Yorker  — “a masterpiece, in its way, it’s not always serious: this is a crowd-pleaser…It’s a funny film: a collage that’s also a kind of Duchampian ready-made.” — and The New York Times — “It is hard to walk out of Mr. Marclay’s loop because inside it you are protected from the dreadful inevitability of endings” — recently reviewed this installation/film; both say it’s worth seeing. However, neither mentioned if the whole film, all 24 hours of it, is worth seeing, or how the film or the experience differs from seeing it from a different time of day.

VeblenesqueGorge recently saw this at pre-dawn:

There was also somewhat more fascination in seeing what film characters were up to at four in the morning than four in the afternoon. …

Watching The Clock, though, you find yourself anticipating the changes in the day as they are refracted through the film clips. How is what people get up to at 4am different than at 5am?

Anyway, this is my weekend plan. Will be watching this in four 6-hour[ishes] shifts: Fri., 12am-6am; Sat., 12pm-6pm; Sun., 6am-12pm; and Tues. (or some weeknight next week), 6pm-12am.

It’ll be a doozy.

The Clock is showing at the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center (Broadway, between 62nd & 63rd sts.). Admission is free.

It runs from 8:00 am – 10:00 pm, Tuesday through Thursday, and then continuously from 8:00 am Friday through 10:00 pm Sunday. It’s closed on Mondays. Now through Aug. 1. Check @LCAtrium twitter feed for line updates.

UPDATE: Saw all 24 hours of The Clock, and it.is.worth.it . But even a few hours of seeing this installation/film is worth it.

If you missed it at Lincoln Center, Christian Marclay’s The Clock will be showing next winter at The Frick Collection. Dates and times TBD.

MOMA has also acquired it and will be showing it there soon.

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