"Cafés are crowded with young men and women staring at their laptops": Brooklyn is now a novelists’ neighbourhood. (The Guardian)
Related:
[Brooklyn] is a zone of infestation. Not only of novelists but reporters, pundits, poets and those often closeted scribblers who call themselves editors and agents. Not to mention bloggers, or whatever counts for being an online writer these days. (New York Observer)
If you want to write novels, you move to Brooklyn (MFA vs. NYC)
"Brooklyn is repulsive with novelists; it’s cancerous with novelists." Jonathan Lethem

"Cafés are crowded with young men and women staring at their laptops": Brooklyn is now a novelists’ neighbourhood. (The Guardian)

Related:

[Brooklyn] is a zone of infestation. Not only of novelists but reporters, pundits, poets and those often closeted scribblers who call themselves editors and agents. Not to mention bloggers, or whatever counts for being an online writer these days. (New York Observer)

If you want to write novels, you move to Brooklyn (MFA vs. NYC)

"Brooklyn is repulsive with novelists; it’s cancerous with novelists." Jonathan Lethem


Tina slid her legs off the bed, stood, and started to dress. Chet lay on his back and lit a smoke.She said, “On Thursday I’m going to kill him.”“I don’t want to know about it.”“Yeah, you don’t want to know.”He took a deep drag. Exhaled. He said, “How you gonna do it?”She walked to the bed, turned, lifted her hair with both hands. He sat up and zippered her dress.She took her purse off the dresser and left.The sun outside on Brooklyn sidewalk made her squint. She saw the police car across the street, two cops sitting in the front seat. She started walking. The cops saw her too. They got out of the car. She walked faster. “Miss, hey miss!”Subway stairs at the corner. 20 feet away. 10 feet. She could hear a train pulling in.

One of the 28 finalists for City Room’s contest for its readers to write hypothetical opening paragraphs for Atlantic Avenue, an actual pulp-fiction novel published in 1956.

Tina slid her legs off the bed, stood, and started to dress.

Chet lay on his back and lit a smoke.

She said, “On Thursday I’m going to kill him.”

“I don’t want to know about it.”

“Yeah, you don’t want to know.”

He took a deep drag. Exhaled.

He said, “How you gonna do it?”

She walked to the bed, turned, lifted her hair with both hands. He sat up and zippered her dress.

She took her purse off the dresser and left.

The sun outside on Brooklyn sidewalk made her squint.

She saw the police car across the street, two cops sitting in the front seat. She started walking. The cops saw her too. They got out of the car. She walked faster.

“Miss, hey miss!”

Subway stairs at the corner. 20 feet away. 10 feet. She could hear a train pulling in.

One of the 28 finalists for City Room’s contest for its readers to write hypothetical opening paragraphs for Atlantic Avenue, an actual pulp-fiction novel published in 1956.

A TARDIS grows in Brooklyn
at The Way Station, a bar in Prospect Heights where its bathroom is a TARDIS. And yes it’s bigger on the inside.
(photo by Kimberly Fenwick)
Allons-y!

A TARDIS grows in Brooklyn

at The Way Station, a bar in Prospect Heights where its bathroom is a TARDIS. And yes it’s bigger on the inside.

(photo by Kimberly Fenwick)

Allons-y!

veblenesquegorge:

Winter Scene in Brooklyn, by Francis Guy, ca. 1820
I frankly hate winter in Brooklyn, but I love this painting, which depicts Front Street (I think) right under the future Brooklyn Bridge.

veblenesquegorge:

Winter Scene in Brooklyn, by Francis Guy, ca. 1820

I frankly hate winter in Brooklyn, but I love this painting, which depicts Front Street (I think) right under the future Brooklyn Bridge.

at Conover and Coffey Streets, in Red Hook, Brooklyn — two gorgeous murals, depicting both indulgences, wine and chocolate.

(via kittylittered/New York Portraits)

Three girls on Bond Street in Brooklyn. July 1974. (Photo by Danny  Lyon / NARA)
Here Is What Brooklyn Was Like In The Summer Of 1974 (Business Insider)
[way before they came along]

Three girls on Bond Street in Brooklyn. July 1974. (Photo by Danny Lyon / NARA)

Here Is What Brooklyn Was Like In The Summer Of 1974 (Business Insider)

[way before they came along]


The book itself is set in the ’50s in an area of Brooklyn so harsh that  any sign of weakness is met with violence. So the dialogue reflects the  type of neighborhood where someone might rape you or beat you half to  death because they don’t like the way you walk. …
The beauty of ‘Last Exit’ is that, against the odds, these  characters are reaching. So as much as you are revolted by their flaws,  you also start to see them as the product of their own fight against  this neighborhood. 
In that way, the  neighborhood becomes a character — the antagonist out to crush hope. And  Selby Jr.’s characters try so hard to defeat that antagonist — they  love, they dream, they try to transcend their lot.

In ‘Last Exit,’ Brooklyn Is A Character, Too (npr)
[image: Brooklyn 1950’s, by Bruce Davidson]

The book itself is set in the ’50s in an area of Brooklyn so harsh that any sign of weakness is met with violence. So the dialogue reflects the type of neighborhood where someone might rape you or beat you half to death because they don’t like the way you walk. …

The beauty of ‘Last Exit’ is that, against the odds, these characters are reaching. So as much as you are revolted by their flaws, you also start to see them as the product of their own fight against this neighborhood.

In that way, the neighborhood becomes a character — the antagonist out to crush hope. And Selby Jr.’s characters try so hard to defeat that antagonist — they love, they dream, they try to transcend their lot.

In ‘Last Exit,’ Brooklyn Is A Character, Too (npr)

[image: Brooklyn 1950’s, by Bruce Davidson]

"the change of the New York accents to a linear California valley-girl  type accent full of "likes" and phrasing everything in the form of a  question"— (commenter Eric K                   from Sheepshead Bay)
"it’s sad that the new york accent is becoming extinct…i miss the flat vowels and the drop Rs at the end of the word, and i think the uptalking is the worst trend amongst the 20, and 30 somethings too; it’s awful we all talk in the same way" — (amy sohn, author of prospect park west)
they used to say that 1 out of 7 people in the country can trace their roots out of brooklyn; today, 1 out of 7 people in brooklyn are from ohio. —(steve hindy, co-founder of brooklyn brewery)
signs of a gentrifying neighborhood when you have to look down and keep  your eyes on the sidewalk [for dogs].
"Most of the trends they refer to are trends that "Hipsters" have brought  over the bridge. They say they love living in Brooklyn more than the  city but bring everything the city offers here. If they truly love  Brooklyn, let it remain Brooklyn and build and improve on what’s great  about the largest borough in the nation––not turn it into a mini  Manhattan." — (commenter Rose)
brooklyn trend pieces (wnyc)
(image via)
  • "the change of the New York accents to a linear California valley-girl type accent full of "likes" and phrasing everything in the form of a question"— (commenter Eric K from Sheepshead Bay)
  • "it’s sad that the new york accent is becoming extinct…i miss the flat vowels and the drop Rs at the end of the word, and i think the uptalking is the worst trend amongst the 20, and 30 somethings too; it’s awful we all talk in the same way" — (amy sohn, author of prospect park west)
  • they used to say that 1 out of 7 people in the country can trace their roots out of brooklyn; today, 1 out of 7 people in brooklyn are from ohio. —(steve hindy, co-founder of brooklyn brewery)
  • signs of a gentrifying neighborhood when you have to look down and keep your eyes on the sidewalk [for dogs].
  • "Most of the trends they refer to are trends that "Hipsters" have brought over the bridge. They say they love living in Brooklyn more than the city but bring everything the city offers here. If they truly love Brooklyn, let it remain Brooklyn and build and improve on what’s great about the largest borough in the nation––not turn it into a mini Manhattan." — (commenter Rose)

brooklyn trend pieces (wnyc)

(image via)

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

Something about this look begged to be photographed. I gave it my best Bill Cunningham.
Brooklyn, NY.

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

Something about this look begged to be photographed. I gave it my best Bill Cunningham.

Brooklyn, NY.