783 Park Avenue (Apt. 17B), the fictional residence of Don and Megan in Mad Men.
The building (783) does not exist, if it did, it would be there in the middle of 73rd Street (at east of Park Ave.).
Just to give an idea on what the building may have been like, there’s 775 Park Ave.

and 785 Park Ave.

But no 783 Park.
I guess the producers did their homework and made sure that the building will not be part of the Mad Men tour, and gave the Park Avenue residents a respite since no tourists will be swarming to take pictures in front of the fictional building.
(See also the annotations of Mad Men episodes by The Bowery Boys)

783 Park Avenue (Apt. 17B), the fictional residence of Don and Megan in Mad Men.

The building (783) does not exist, if it did, it would be there in the middle of 73rd Street (at east of Park Ave.).

Just to give an idea on what the building may have been like, there’s 775 Park Ave.

and 785 Park Ave.

But no 783 Park.

I guess the producers did their homework and made sure that the building will not be part of the Mad Men tour, and gave the Park Avenue residents a respite since no tourists will be swarming to take pictures in front of the fictional building.

(See also the annotations of Mad Men episodes by The Bowery Boys)

Album Art

Zou Bisou Bisou, Gillian Hills

ArtistGillian Hills
TitleZou Bisou Bisou
AlbumZou Bisou Bisou (EP)
i bitchface ny
Howard Johnson at 46th Street Times Square 1972, by Bob Gruen (via Ephemeral  New York)

In the 1980s, it was an ideal spot to watch theater-goers and  prostitutes.
In the ’90s, the now beaten but still thriving diner stood in contrast  to the changing fortunes of Times Square, dwarfed by the multi-million  dollar makeover. Eventually its corner real estate became too valuable  for it to survive and it closed in 2005 — one of the last Howard  Johnson’s restaurants in America. 

'Mad Men' notes: Remembering the Times Square HoJo  (the bowery boys)

Howard Johnson at 46th Street Times Square 1972, by Bob Gruen (via Ephemeral New York)

In the 1980s, it was an ideal spot to watch theater-goers and prostitutes.

In the ’90s, the now beaten but still thriving diner stood in contrast to the changing fortunes of Times Square, dwarfed by the multi-million dollar makeover. Eventually its corner real estate became too valuable for it to survive and it closed in 2005 — one of the last Howard Johnson’s restaurants in America.

'Mad Men' notes: Remembering the Times Square HoJo (the bowery boys)

don draper’s apartment, where he has been slumming it in bohemia and bringing  a hooker to slap him around: 104 Waverly Place, described by the Times in 2006 under its alternate 29 Washington Square West address as an  elegant “co-op building that contains some of the few old-fashioned  Park-Avenue-style ‘Classic Six’ units to be found downtown. unfortunately, today, the building is in the heart of NYU’s campus. 
(my first guess of where don may live was 136 waverly place)
(image via curbed)

don draper’s apartment, where he has been slumming it in bohemia and bringing  a hooker to slap him around: 104 Waverly Place, described by the Times in 2006 under its alternate 29 Washington Square West address as an elegant “co-op building that contains some of the few old-fashioned Park-Avenue-style ‘Classic Six’ units to be found downtown. unfortunately, today, the building is in the heart of NYU’s campus.

(my first guess of where don may live was 136 waverly place)

(image via curbed)

so midge tracked down don, just like james bond…
(goldfinger was the latest in james bond series in 1965,
thus this goes my mad men related post for season 4, episode 12)

so midge tracked down don, just like james bond…

(goldfinger was the latest in james bond series in 1965,

thus this goes my mad men related post for season 4, episode 12)

"As the Beatles performed near second base on the baseball field, some of the fans near the front row begged police to bring them blades of grass, simply because the Beatles had walked on them. One policewoman remarked, "They are psychos. Their mothers ought to see them now." During the thirty minutes that the band performed police watched the crowd carefully as hundreds of flashbulbs went off and young girls sobbed. Many girls who had fainted or were in hysterics were carried to the first aid dressing room on the stadium’s ground level."
— It Happened in New York by Fran Capo and Frank Brozellieri

"As the Beatles performed near second base on the baseball field, some of the fans near the front row begged police to bring them blades of grass, simply because the Beatles had walked on them. One policewoman remarked, "They are psychos. Their mothers ought to see them now." During the thirty minutes that the band performed police watched the crowd carefully as hundreds of flashbulbs went off and young girls sobbed. Many girls who had fainted or were in hysterics were carried to the first aid dressing room on the stadium’s ground level."

It Happened in New York by Fran Capo and Frank Brozellieri

New York City Playboy Club
(at 5 East 59th Street,opened december 8th, 1962)

"In Hefnerland, a woman is simply another aspect of the status symbol mania that is stamped all over Playboy. She is no more or less important than the sleekest sports car or the most expensive bottle of Scotch”
~ Diana Lurie, LIFE Magazine, Oct. 29, 1965

New York City Playboy Club

(at 5 East 59th Street,opened december 8th, 1962)

"In Hefnerland, a woman is simply another aspect of the status symbol mania that is stamped all over Playboy. She is no more or less important than the sleekest sports car or the most expensive bottle of Scotch”

~ Diana Lurie, LIFE Magazine, Oct. 29, 1965

[insert caption here]

[insert caption here]

Metamorphosis, 1964, by Bridget Riley

Riley was a forerunner of Op Art, using simple shapes and colors to  create the optical illusions that typified the movement. Popularized in  late 1964 when an article ran in Time magazine coining the term, it demonstrates that even in the 60s, Americans would eat anything up if you shorten the number of syllables.
Like shoeless Bert Cooper before him, Roger Sterling arts up his office  with  pieces that spark reactions from not only from the audience, but  from  characters on the show. Prodigal son Freddie Rumsen sits next to a  piece  incredibly similar to Riley’s work and frustratedly remarks, “I  feel  like I’m being sucked in.” Whether or not this says more about  Roger or Freddie, it would seem Mad Men has graduated from using  costumes and historical events (obvious!) to references and set decor  (subtle!) to immerse the viewer.
(via robocorgi)

Metamorphosis, 1964, by Bridget Riley

Riley was a forerunner of Op Art, using simple shapes and colors to create the optical illusions that typified the movement. Popularized in late 1964 when an article ran in Time magazine coining the term, it demonstrates that even in the 60s, Americans would eat anything up if you shorten the number of syllables.

Like shoeless Bert Cooper before him, Roger Sterling arts up his office with pieces that spark reactions from not only from the audience, but from characters on the show. Prodigal son Freddie Rumsen sits next to a piece incredibly similar to Riley’s work and frustratedly remarks, “I feel like I’m being sucked in.” Whether or not this says more about Roger or Freddie, it would seem Mad Men has graduated from using costumes and historical events (obvious!) to references and set decor (subtle!) to immerse the viewer.

(via robocorgi)