the blue glow of twilight at Madison Square
A French artist’s moody, magical New York

the blue glow of twilight at Madison Square

A French artist’s moody, magical New York

Past to present … New York’s people and and places spill on to the pages of countless books about the city.
A literary crawl of New York
1930s
Call It Sleep by Henry Roth: … capturing the immigrant patois of the Lower East Side, 1934’s Call It Sleep has no equal. “You stay righd hea in de daw an’ don’ go ‘way or I’ll moider you!” one character exclaims.
1940s
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison: A brilliant early novel of the black experience in modern America, set largely in Harlem where the unnamed narrator moves through the streets of Manhattan, unseen by whites… . “I’m in New York, but New York ain’t in me, understand what I mean? Don’t git corrupted,” advises one character. It ain’t pretty but Invisible Man is a bitter, brilliant and dismayingly current portrait of New York.
1950s
 New York 19 by Tony Schwartz: … Not a book, but an album. … Schwartz was a lifelong agoraphobic who rarely moved beyond the confines of his block, and yet managed to capture the cacophony of Manhattan’s streets.
1960s
Lunch Poems by Frank O’Hara: … Some poems might read as code to a non-New Yorker. … But his 1964 work Lunch Poems includes the famous “Ave Maria” which calls for something many of New York’s inhabitants lack - space. “Mothers of America”, he writes, let your kids go to the movies! Get them out of the house so they won’t know what you’re up to.”
1970s
The Power Broker by Robert Caro: No man has done more to shape what modern New York City looks like than Robert Moses, … Caro’s biography is a study not only of the man who changed New York but the New York he changed.
1980s
Bright Lights Big City by Jay McInerney: The endless search for booze, cocaine and sex that characterised New York City in the “me me me” … The real hero of the novel is Tad Allagash, the narrator’s friend, who is obsessed with the hurly-burly world of Manhattan. Cynical, cyclical and Celine-like, McInerney’s book suspends a certain fast-living era of New York in ambered perpetuity.
1990s
My Misspent Youth by Meghan Daum: Chasing away the hangover of the 80s, the 90s were a time of reckless hope in New York City. … Meghan Daum’s book of essays captures one woman’s enchantment and subsequent disillusionment with the ever-retreating ideal of Manhattan living.
2000s
Lush Life by Richard Price: Richard Price’s crime novel in 2008 isn’t all that different from the LES in the bud of the 20th century, as portrayed by Henry Roth in Call It Sleep… but the treasure of the novel is Price’s ability to peek into the windows and psyches of both LES old timers and arrivistes.
— by Joshua Stein for The Guardian UK

Past to present … New York’s people and and places spill on to the pages of countless books about the city.

A literary crawl of New York

1930s

Call It Sleep by Henry Roth: … capturing the immigrant patois of the Lower East Side, 1934’s Call It Sleep has no equal. “You stay righd hea in de daw an’ don’ go ‘way or I’ll moider you!” one character exclaims.

1940s

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison: A brilliant early novel of the black experience in modern America, set largely in Harlem where the unnamed narrator moves through the streets of Manhattan, unseen by whites… . “I’m in New York, but New York ain’t in me, understand what I mean? Don’t git corrupted,” advises one character. It ain’t pretty but Invisible Man is a bitter, brilliant and dismayingly current portrait of New York.

1950s

New York 19 by Tony Schwartz: … Not a book, but an album. … Schwartz was a lifelong agoraphobic who rarely moved beyond the confines of his block, and yet managed to capture the cacophony of Manhattan’s streets.

1960s

Lunch Poems by Frank O’Hara: … Some poems might read as code to a non-New Yorker. … But his 1964 work Lunch Poems includes the famous “Ave Maria” which calls for something many of New York’s inhabitants lack - space. “Mothers of America”, he writes, let your kids go to the movies! Get them out of the house so they won’t know what you’re up to.”

1970s

The Power Broker by Robert Caro: No man has done more to shape what modern New York City looks like than Robert Moses, … Caro’s biography is a study not only of the man who changed New York but the New York he changed.

1980s

Bright Lights Big City by Jay McInerney: The endless search for booze, cocaine and sex that characterised New York City in the “me me me” … The real hero of the novel is Tad Allagash, the narrator’s friend, who is obsessed with the hurly-burly world of Manhattan. Cynical, cyclical and Celine-like, McInerney’s book suspends a certain fast-living era of New York in ambered perpetuity.

1990s

My Misspent Youth by Meghan Daum: Chasing away the hangover of the 80s, the 90s were a time of reckless hope in New York City. … Meghan Daum’s book of essays captures one woman’s enchantment and subsequent disillusionment with the ever-retreating ideal of Manhattan living.

2000s

Lush Life by Richard Price: Richard Price’s crime novel in 2008 isn’t all that different from the LES in the bud of the 20th century, as portrayed by Henry Roth in Call It Sleep… but the treasure of the novel is Price’s ability to peek into the windows and psyches of both LES old timers and arrivistes.

— by Joshua Stein for The Guardian UK

Metropolis is New York by day, and Gotham City is New York by night. … Gotham is Manhattan below 14th Street at 3 a.m., November 28, in a cold year. Metropolis is Manhattan between 14th and 110th Street on the brightest, sunniest July day of the year.” ~ Dennis O’Neil, “Afterword" Batman Knightfall: A Novel

(h/t The Bowery Boys)

"Cafés are crowded with young men and women staring at their laptops": Brooklyn is now a novelists’ neighbourhood. (The Guardian)
Related:
[Brooklyn] is a zone of infestation. Not only of novelists but reporters, pundits, poets and those often closeted scribblers who call themselves editors and agents. Not to mention bloggers, or whatever counts for being an online writer these days. (New York Observer)
If you want to write novels, you move to Brooklyn (MFA vs. NYC)
"Brooklyn is repulsive with novelists; it’s cancerous with novelists." Jonathan Lethem

"Cafés are crowded with young men and women staring at their laptops": Brooklyn is now a novelists’ neighbourhood. (The Guardian)

Related:

[Brooklyn] is a zone of infestation. Not only of novelists but reporters, pundits, poets and those often closeted scribblers who call themselves editors and agents. Not to mention bloggers, or whatever counts for being an online writer these days. (New York Observer)

If you want to write novels, you move to Brooklyn (MFA vs. NYC)

"Brooklyn is repulsive with novelists; it’s cancerous with novelists." Jonathan Lethem

camouflage beach leggings, advertised in Harper’s Magazine in September 1919
New York City swimsuit edition, 1880-1920 (The Bowery Boys)

camouflage beach leggings, advertised in Harper’s Magazine in September 1919

New York City swimsuit edition, 1880-1920 (The Bowery Boys)

See Greenpoint Ave. right there, running across that Queens neighborhood? I say Sunnyside will be the next neighborhood to be gentrified/homogenized/suburbanized/mallified by the hipsters or otherwise.

New York Magazine did put Sunnyside as the 3rd most livable neighborhood in NYC.

It’s a leafy quiet neighborhood and has the feel of a quaint little town. It has affordable rents, lots of Irish pubs and ethnic restaurants, and an old school movie theater, Center Cinemas, showing first-run films for $5 matinee, and $7 regular price. Nightlife is somewhat lacking but it’s only minutes away from Greenpoint, Long Island City, Astoria, and Uptown and midtown Manhattan. It has the feel and reminds me of pre-gentrified/NYU’d East Village.

Hope I just didn’t put a death knell to this neighborhood.
Also, do these 50 things before Queens gets completely gentrified.

See Greenpoint Ave. right there, running across that Queens neighborhood? I say Sunnyside will be the next neighborhood to be gentrified/homogenized/suburbanized/mallified by the hipsters or otherwise.

New York Magazine did put Sunnyside as the 3rd most livable neighborhood in NYC.

It’s a leafy quiet neighborhood and has the feel of a quaint little town. It has affordable rents, lots of Irish pubs and ethnic restaurants, and an old school movie theater, Center Cinemas, showing first-run films for $5 matinee, and $7 regular price. Nightlife is somewhat lacking but it’s only minutes away from Greenpoint, Long Island City, Astoria, and Uptown and midtown Manhattan. It has the feel and reminds me of pre-gentrified/NYU’d East Village.

Hope I just didn’t put a death knell to this neighborhood.

Also, do these 50 things before Queens gets completely gentrified.

Intel New York Music Festival, July 16-19, 1997
Club/Music Venues:
- Acme Underground — Closed 2006. Now Ace of Clubs.
- alt.coffee (my favorite 2) — Closed 2007.

Became Hopscotch. Now Sustainable NYC.
- Arlene’s Grocery — Still there.
- The Bottom Line — Closed 2004. Now an NYU academic complex.
- Brownies — Changed it’s name to HiFi, but no more live music.
- CBGB & OMFUG. Do I have to say what happened to this?

- CB’s 313 Gallery — Closed 2006. Became The Morrison Hotel Gallery. And a pop-up clothing store. Now sits empty.
- Coney Island High (my favorite 1) — Closed. Now a sushi and noodle place, and condo apts.

- Continental — Still there, but no longer a punk venue and no more live music. Now with big screen TVs catering to the NYU kids, b&ts, and the urban haute bourgeois.
- The Cooler — Closed 2001. Became RARE, a rock club/bar/restaurant. Now?
- fez (under time cafe) — Closed 2005. Now Chinatown Brasserie.
- Irivng Plaza. Still there. (woo-hoo!)
- Knitting Factory —  Moved to Tribeca in 1994, closed 2008. Now in Brooklyn.  74 Leonard Street still in the market.
- Lions Den —  Closed 2007. Now Sullivan Hall.
- The Mercury Lounge — Still there.
- New Music Cafe — Closed. Became Shine. Now?
- S.O.B’s — Still there.
- Roxy — Closed 2007. Still sitting vacant.
- Tramp’s — Closed 2001. Became Centro Fly. And then Duvet Lounge (popularized by that show). Still vacant and on the market today.
- Vinyl — Closed 200?. Became Arc. Now?
- Wetlands Preserve — Closed 2001. Now a condo.
Good times. Good Times.
Related:
- Top Eleven Since-Closed Live Music Venues in NYC
- New York City Area Concert Venues of the 1990′s
- Avenue A, 1st Avenue, and 2nd Avenue in 1997

Intel New York Music Festival, July 16-19, 1997

Club/Music Venues:

- Acme Underground — Closed 2006. Now Ace of Clubs.

- alt.coffee (my favorite 2) — Closed 2007.

Became Hopscotch. Now Sustainable NYC.

- Arlene’s Grocery — Still there.

- The Bottom LineClosed 2004. Now an NYU academic complex.

- Brownies — Changed it’s name to HiFi, but no more live music.

- CBGB & OMFUG. Do I have to say what happened to this?

- CB’s 313 Gallery — Closed 2006. Became The Morrison Hotel Gallery. And a pop-up clothing store. Now sits empty.

- Coney Island High (my favorite 1) — Closed. Now a sushi and noodle place, and condo apts.

- Continental — Still there, but no longer a punk venue and no more live music. Now with big screen TVs catering to the NYU kids, b&ts, and the urban haute bourgeois.

- The Cooler — Closed 2001. Became RARE, a rock club/bar/restaurant. Now?

- fez (under time cafe) — Closed 2005. Now Chinatown Brasserie.

- Irivng Plaza. Still there. (woo-hoo!)

- Knitting Factory — Moved to Tribeca in 1994, closed 2008. Now in Brooklyn.  74 Leonard Street still in the market.

- Lions Den — Closed 2007. Now Sullivan Hall.

- The Mercury Lounge — Still there.

- New Music Cafe — Closed. Became Shine. Now?

- S.O.B’s — Still there.

- Roxy — Closed 2007. Still sitting vacant.

- Tramp’s — Closed 2001. Became Centro Fly. And then Duvet Lounge (popularized by that show). Still vacant and on the market today.

- Vinyl — Closed 200?. Became Arc. Now?

- Wetlands Preserve — Closed 2001. Now a condo.

Good times. Good Times.

Related:

- Top Eleven Since-Closed Live Music Venues in NYC

- New York City Area Concert Venues of the 1990′s

- Avenue A, 1st Avenue, and 2nd Avenue in 1997

[Dana Meilijson at Second Avenue and 81st Street]
In her series “Everyday Interruptions,” Dana Meilijson took self-portraits in  various locations around Manhattan.

"I was amazed by the quickness of the city’s rhythm. People walk fast, and there seems to be no time for simple things.
Her pictures capture the simplicity and stillness of everyday activities.
a coffee shop on First Avenue at 85th Street.
… some things got lost, like being in the park and really enjoying the  experience, or having a cup of coffee because of its delicious taste and  not because I needed to stay awake and alert so as to keep pace with  the city.”

The Woman in Red (NYT)

[Dana Meilijson at Second Avenue and 81st Street]

In her series “Everyday Interruptions,” Dana Meilijson took self-portraits in various locations around Manhattan.

"I was amazed by the quickness of the city’s rhythm. People walk fast, and there seems to be no time for simple things.

Her pictures capture the simplicity and stillness of everyday activities.


a coffee shop on First Avenue at 85th Street.

… some things got lost, like being in the park and really enjoying the experience, or having a cup of coffee because of its delicious taste and not because I needed to stay awake and alert so as to keep pace with the city.”

The Woman in Red (NYT)

A subway car covered in graffiti [c. 1980’s]
New York of the 1980’s

A subway car covered in graffiti [c. 1980’s]

New York of the 1980’s

Big Apple Scenes — Discover New York from an insider’s point of view
Crown Restaurant (Adam Golfer for WSJ)
Sure, the city’s too clean, too green, too smoke-free, for some native  tastes. It’s more expensive than ever to live here, but there’s a  reason—make that many—that those little town blues are melting away.  Again.
 Russ & Daughters (Adam Golfer for WSJ)
With the tourist hordes gone, it’s a perfect time to bundle up and roll with the locals.
Insider’s Guide to New York City (WSJ)

Big Apple Scenes — Discover New York from an insider’s point of view


Crown Restaurant (Adam Golfer for WSJ)

Sure, the city’s too clean, too green, too smoke-free, for some native tastes. It’s more expensive than ever to live here, but there’s a reason—make that many—that those little town blues are melting away. Again.


Russ & Daughters (Adam Golfer for WSJ)

With the tourist hordes gone, it’s a perfect time to bundle up and roll with the locals.

Insider’s Guide to New York City (WSJ)


bryanwaterman:

A young Kim Gordon on the NYC subway, 1970s. via @thegurglingcod <- @strippertweets <- @graphpaperheart <- @visitordesign <- SYForum

bryanwaterman:

A young Kim Gordon on the NYC subway, 1970s. via @thegurglingcod <- @strippertweets <- @graphpaperheart <- @visitordesign <- SYForum

more of what was there &#8212; East Village (NW corner of Lafayette St. and E.Houston St.) then [1929] and now

more of what was there — East Village (NW corner of Lafayette St. and E.Houston St.) then [1929] and now

from M. Sasek&#8217;s children&#8217;s classic, This is New York


The charm and uniqueness of New York City was never more beautifully  and whimsically created for children than in Miroslav Sasek&#8217;s This Is New York.  First published in 1960, his vision of New York nearly forty years ago  still remains fresh:
the hustle and bustle of Times Square, 
the ethnic  neighborhoods,
the awe-inspiring architecture. 


Sasek captured the  essences of New York

 that delight children and parents, 
 many of whom who  will remember the book from their childhood.

from M. Sasek’s children’s classic, This is New York

The charm and uniqueness of New York City was never more beautifully and whimsically created for children than in Miroslav Sasek’s This Is New York. First published in 1960, his vision of New York nearly forty years ago still remains fresh:

the hustle and bustle of Times Square,

the ethnic neighborhoods,

the awe-inspiring architecture.

Sasek captured the essences of New York

that delight children and parents,

many of whom who will remember the book from their childhood.



Bordeaux Restaurant Week starts today (thru Nov. 21)
the mermaid inn and yerba buena are two ev restaurants that are participating. map of participating restaurants here.
(photo via nyt)

Bordeaux Restaurant Week starts today (thru Nov. 21)

the mermaid inn and yerba buena are two ev restaurants that are participating. map of participating restaurants here.

(photo via nyt)