camouflage beach leggings, advertised in Harper’s Magazine in September 1919
New York City swimsuit edition, 1880-1920 (The Bowery Boys)

camouflage beach leggings, advertised in Harper’s Magazine in September 1919

New York City swimsuit edition, 1880-1920 (The Bowery Boys)

New York Library

a room off The Iroquois New York lobby whose name leads some people to think that it’s a branch of The New York Public Library. It is not. But it is an eclectic collection of books about New York City, which may be freely enjoyed by hotel guests and by suitably discreet visitors.


The titles include “Subwayland” and “Old Penn Station,” “Broadway Musicals” and “Times Square Spectacular,” “Wall Street” and “212 Views of Central Park.” There’s “Lost New York,” “Antiquing New York,” “Tales of Gaslight New York,” “The Battle for New York,” “The Best Bars of New York,” and, nostalgically, “Great Blizzards of New York City.”

New York Library

a room off The Iroquois New York lobby whose name leads some people to think that it’s a branch of The New York Public Library. It is not. But it is an eclectic collection of books about New York City, which may be freely enjoyed by hotel guests and by suitably discreet visitors.

The titles include “Subwayland” and “Old Penn Station,” “Broadway Musicals” and “Times Square Spectacular,” “Wall Street” and “212 Views of Central Park.” There’s “Lost New York,” “Antiquing New York,” “Tales of Gaslight New York,” “The Battle for New York,” “The Best Bars of New York,” and, nostalgically, “Great Blizzards of New York City.”


Ms. Wharton’s childhood home, at 14 West 23rd Street, in 1880.
(now houses a Starbucks, of course)

Edith Wharton Turns 150 (NYT)

Ms. Wharton’s childhood home, at 14 West 23rd Street, in 1880.

(now houses a Starbucks, of course)

Edith Wharton Turns 150 (NYT)

Bleecker Street Cinema

"One of Allen’s most poignant films, Crimes and  			Misdemeanors posed deeply philosophical questions of moral absolutes  			(cut with several comedic layers, including a brilliant turn by Alan  			Alda as a successful television producer). The themes of morals,  			values and ethics were played out across a wide Manhattan stage,  			including the Bleecker Street Cinema in Greenwich Village.  			Unfortunately, the theater no longer exists (it had been located at  			144 Bleecker Street and is now a video store Duane Reade and a stationery store). In the film, this is  			where Woody takes his niece to see movies he feels will make her a  			better person. (The theater is also where Aidan Quinn worked as a  			projectionist in the Madonna movie, Desperately Seeking Susan.)”

a  		Woody Allen walking tour of New York City

Bleecker Street Cinema

"One of Allen’s most poignant films, Crimes and Misdemeanors posed deeply philosophical questions of moral absolutes (cut with several comedic layers, including a brilliant turn by Alan Alda as a successful television producer). The themes of morals, values and ethics were played out across a wide Manhattan stage, including the Bleecker Street Cinema in Greenwich Village. Unfortunately, the theater no longer exists (it had been located at 144 Bleecker Street and is now a video store Duane Reade and a stationery store). In the film, this is where Woody takes his niece to see movies he feels will make her a better person. (The theater is also where Aidan Quinn worked as a projectionist in the Madonna movie, Desperately Seeking Susan.)”

a Woody Allen walking tour of New York City

It was a gray city, a weary one, an older one. There were, in those  days, pornographic  theaters in good neighborhoods; Bowery-style wino  bars with sawdust on the floor on Upper Broadway; prostitutes along West  End Avenue slipping into cars with New Jersey license plates. It was a  city, too, that seemed to open up into an infinite series of magic  boxes, of novelty shops and diners, delicatessens and corner bakeries,  used record stores and bookstores.
New York Was So Much Older Then (NYT)
(illustration: “Late Traveler,” a 1949 drypoint etching by Martin Lewis)

It was a gray city, a weary one, an older one. There were, in those days, pornographic theaters in good neighborhoods; Bowery-style wino bars with sawdust on the floor on Upper Broadway; prostitutes along West End Avenue slipping into cars with New Jersey license plates. It was a city, too, that seemed to open up into an infinite series of magic boxes, of novelty shops and diners, delicatessens and corner bakeries, used record stores and bookstores.

New York Was So Much Older Then (NYT)

(illustration: “Late Traveler,” a 1949 drypoint etching by Martin Lewis)

[8th ave. bet. 44th and 45th sts., circa 1982]
Street Level Panoramas of New York from 1982 
[update: the site/link works now and then.]

[8th ave. bet. 44th and 45th sts., circa 1982]

Street Level Panoramas of New York from 1982 

[update: the site/link works now and then.]

the IRT 7th ave. line, circa 1970’s

the IRT 7th ave. line, circa 1970’s

(via pithyaphorisms)

getbackvassifer:

Broadway & 8th

getbackvassifer:

Broadway & 8th

(via stupefactionblog)

oldnewyork:

Maker: James Jowers (American b. 1938) Title: L. E. side Date: 1967 Medium: gelatin silver print Dimensions: Image: 15.9 x 24 cm Overall: 20.1 x 25.4 cm
 (We always used to play on the fire escape.)

oldnewyork:

Maker: James Jowers (American b. 1938)
Title: L. E. side
Date: 1967
Medium: gelatin silver print
Dimensions: Image: 15.9 x 24 cm Overall: 20.1 x 25.4 cm


(We always used to play on the fire escape.)

Grand Luncheonette, New York City circa 1960s
Vanished on October 19th, 1997, the Grand Luncheonette on 42nd street bet. 7th & 8th avenues was one of Time Square’s old-time businesses and unforgettable lunch counters on 42nd street west of seventh ave.
per NYT’s article, Luncheonette’s Grill Turns Off for Good:

"I was here on V-E Day, the place loaded with soldiers,” 
”I’ve been here every New Year’s Eve,” Mr. Hakim said. ”I was here during the blackout — I can’t remember what year — and we went out and got candles. Dozens of people came in to eat hot dogs.”
"It’s really sad,” he said. ”At one time on this street there was Romeo’s, where you could get a plate of spaghetti for a quarter. There was the Automat. There was Grant’s, and there was Nedick’s hot dog stand.

Watch the five minute film on Grand Luncheonette here.
 (Photo via Richard Estes)

Grand Luncheonette, New York City circa 1960s

Vanished on October 19th, 1997, the Grand Luncheonette on 42nd street bet. 7th & 8th avenues was one of Time Square’s old-time businesses and unforgettable lunch counters on 42nd street west of seventh ave.

per NYT’s article, Luncheonette’s Grill Turns Off for Good:

"I was here on V-E Day, the place loaded with soldiers,” 

”I’ve been here every New Year’s Eve,” Mr. Hakim said. ”I was here during the blackout — I can’t remember what year — and we went out and got candles. Dozens of people came in to eat hot dogs.”

"It’s really sad,” he said. ”At one time on this street there was Romeo’s, where you could get a plate of spaghetti for a quarter. There was the Automat. There was Grant’s, and there was Nedick’s hot dog stand.

Watch the five minute film on Grand Luncheonette here.

(Photo via Richard Estes)

The inside photo from “The New Inside Guide to Greenwich Village,” published in 1965.

The inside photo from “The New Inside Guide to Greenwich Village,” published in 1965.

newsstand at 14th St and Broadway, 1936
these old school newsstands are slowly vanishing; only a few remain.
as Jeremiah notes: “This is how a city dies, little piece by little piece. A thousand cuts.”

newsstand at 14th St and Broadway, 1936

these old school newsstands are slowly vanishing; only a few remain.

as Jeremiah notes: “This is how a city dies, little piece by little piece. A thousand cuts.”

“To have your own stack of nickels placed in your tiny hands; to be able to choose your own food, richly on display like museum pieces; to make quick and final decisions at the age of eight; this was a lesson in financial dealings that not even two years at the Wharton School could buy today.” — Neil Simon [on the Automat]
(photo: Horn & Hardart, Lexington Avenue, 1954-55 © William Klein)
for further readings:
Meet Me at the Automat (Smithsonian)
Automat Fossils (JVNY)
The Automat.com:History
Last Automat Closes, Its Era Long Gone  (NYT)
(i would have been mayor of this, if foursquare existed back then)

“To have your own stack of nickels placed in your tiny hands; to be able to choose your own food, richly on display like museum pieces; to make quick and final decisions at the age of eight; this was a lesson in financial dealings that not even two years at the Wharton School could buy today.” — Neil Simon [on the Automat]

(photo: Horn & Hardart, Lexington Avenue, 1954-55 © William Klein)

for further readings:

Meet Me at the Automat (Smithsonian)

Automat Fossils (JVNY)

The Automat.com:History

Last Automat Closes, Its Era Long Gone  (NYT)

(i would have been mayor of this, if foursquare existed back then)