783 Park Avenue (Apt. 17B), the fictional residence of Don and Megan in Mad Men.
The building (783) does not exist, if it did, it would be there in the middle of 73rd Street (at east of Park Ave.).
Just to give an idea on what the building may have been like, there’s 775 Park Ave.

and 785 Park Ave.

But no 783 Park.
I guess the producers did their homework and made sure that the building will not be part of the Mad Men tour, and gave the Park Avenue residents a respite since no tourists will be swarming to take pictures in front of the fictional building.
(See also the annotations of Mad Men episodes by The Bowery Boys)

783 Park Avenue (Apt. 17B), the fictional residence of Don and Megan in Mad Men.

The building (783) does not exist, if it did, it would be there in the middle of 73rd Street (at east of Park Ave.).

Just to give an idea on what the building may have been like, there’s 775 Park Ave.

and 785 Park Ave.

But no 783 Park.

I guess the producers did their homework and made sure that the building will not be part of the Mad Men tour, and gave the Park Avenue residents a respite since no tourists will be swarming to take pictures in front of the fictional building.

(See also the annotations of Mad Men episodes by The Bowery Boys)

“C’est dix!”, “Les petites…”, “La fillette de… m’a dit que…” 
Le Moulin à Café sells a range of imported French sweets, condiments and teas; students from the Lycée can spend their pocket money on the same chocolate biscuits they might buy in Paris. 

The cafe, which opened in July 2011, is aesthetically French; there are books of poetry and orange and brown boxes from Hermès to admire on the walls, and even the pastry labels are written in a distinctive French hand.

Lycée Français de New York

“C’est dix!”, “Les petites…”, “La fillette de… m’a dit que…” 

Le Moulin à Café sells a range of imported French sweets, condiments and teas; students from the Lycée can spend their pocket money on the same chocolate biscuits they might buy in Paris.

The cafe, which opened in July 2011, is aesthetically French; there are books of poetry and orange and brown boxes from Hermès to admire on the walls, and even the pastry labels are written in a distinctive French hand.

Lycée Français de New York

[The Progress of Love] The Pursuit, 1773, Jean-Honore Fragonard
You know, back then, this was considered romantic. But today this would be considered stalking and that guy will probably get a restraining order or arrested from pursuing that girl.
Anyway, speaking of Fragonard…
The Fragonard Room is a personal favorite at The Frick Collection. The highlight of the room are the panels by Fragonard, but the room is also furnished with tables, chairs and other decorative objects from the 18th century. 
[Frick Conservation]
Whenever I go to The Frick, which is often (perk of being a member), I head straight to this room and just linger and admire the beautiful panels. It’s a place where I can be alone with my thoughts, in solitude, and just daydream that I am an aristocrat and that this room is where I read books and listen to Bach.
Remember that Twilight Zone episode starring Robert Duvall, where his character keeps going to a museum to see the dollhouse, which comes alive when he’s there, and eventually in the end, he ended up in the dollhouse? 
Often times I wish this would happen to me where I become part of one of the panels, if not the room.
More of The Progress of Love here, here, not here, but also here.

[The Progress of Love] The Pursuit, 1773, Jean-Honore Fragonard

You know, back then, this was considered romantic. But today this would be considered stalking and that guy will probably get a restraining order or arrested from pursuing that girl.

Anyway, speaking of Fragonard…

The Fragonard Room is a personal favorite at The Frick Collection. The highlight of the room are the panels by Fragonard, but the room is also furnished with tables, chairs and other decorative objects from the 18th century. 


[Frick Conservation]

Whenever I go to The Frick, which is often (perk of being a member), I head straight to this room and just linger and admire the beautiful panels. It’s a place where I can be alone with my thoughts, in solitude, and just daydream that I am an aristocrat and that this room is where I read books and listen to Bach.

Remember that Twilight Zone episode starring Robert Duvall, where his character keeps going to a museum to see the dollhouse, which comes alive when he’s there, and eventually in the end, he ended up in the dollhouse?

Often times I wish this would happen to me where I become part of one of the panels, if not the room.

More of The Progress of Love here, here, not here, but also here.

La Promenade, 1870, Pierre-August Renoir 
Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length PaintingFebruary 7, 2012, through May 13, 2012 at The Frick Collection

The Frick Collection will present an exhibition of nine iconic Impressionist paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, offering the first comprehensive study of the artist’s engagement with the full-length format, which was associated with the official Paris Salon in the decade that saw the emergence of a fully fledged Impressionist aesthetic. The project was inspired by La Promenade of 1875–76, the most significant Impressionist work in the Frick’s permanent collection.

Related: Renoir at the Frick (WSJ)

La Promenade, 1870, Pierre-August Renoir

Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting
February 7, 2012, through May 13, 2012 at The Frick Collection

The Frick Collection will present an exhibition of nine iconic Impressionist paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, offering the first comprehensive study of the artist’s engagement with the full-length format, which was associated with the official Paris Salon in the decade that saw the emergence of a fully fledged Impressionist aesthetic. The project was inspired by La Promenade of 1875–76, the most significant Impressionist work in the Frick’s permanent collection.

Related: Renoir at the Frick (WSJ)

View of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum from Fifth ave. looking southeast, New York, ca. 1950 (photo: Robert Mates)
A Timeline of the Guggenheim Museum, 1943-1959

View of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum from Fifth ave. looking southeast, New York, ca. 1950 (photo: Robert Mates)

A Timeline of the Guggenheim Museum, 1943-1959

Big Apple Scenes — Discover New York from an insider’s point of view
Crown Restaurant (Adam Golfer for WSJ)
Sure, the city’s too clean, too green, too smoke-free, for some native  tastes. It’s more expensive than ever to live here, but there’s a  reason—make that many—that those little town blues are melting away.  Again.
 Russ & Daughters (Adam Golfer for WSJ)
With the tourist hordes gone, it’s a perfect time to bundle up and roll with the locals.
Insider’s Guide to New York City (WSJ)

Big Apple Scenes — Discover New York from an insider’s point of view


Crown Restaurant (Adam Golfer for WSJ)

Sure, the city’s too clean, too green, too smoke-free, for some native tastes. It’s more expensive than ever to live here, but there’s a reason—make that many—that those little town blues are melting away. Again.


Russ & Daughters (Adam Golfer for WSJ)

With the tourist hordes gone, it’s a perfect time to bundle up and roll with the locals.

Insider’s Guide to New York City (WSJ)


The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Fifth Avenue facade, 1921 ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Fifth Avenue facade, 1921 ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Holiday display window at Zitomer — a three-story drugstore that is more a mini department store than a pharmacy; old school New York. If you need to shop for that New Yorker who has seen and heard it all, and who demands a narrative with the gift, this is the place. They have their own line of cosmetics called Z New York, such as the Big Apple lip gloss, and other quirky and odds and ends products. On the third floor is Zittles, its toy department where they carry classic toys as well as the latest trends and orever classics, stuffed animals, Madame Alexander Dolls and Barbies. Zitomer is a pharmacy on steroids, and a NYC staple.

Holiday display window at Zitomer — a three-story drugstore that is more a mini department store than a pharmacy; old school New York. If you need to shop for that New Yorker who has seen and heard it all, and who demands a narrative with the gift, this is the place. They have their own line of cosmetics called Z New York, such as the Big Apple lip gloss, and other quirky and odds and ends products. On the third floor is Zittles, its toy department where they carry classic toys as well as the latest trends and orever classics, stuffed animals, Madame Alexander Dolls and Barbies. Zitomer is a pharmacy on steroids, and a NYC staple.


PRIVATE school: $32,000 a year per student.
Mortgage: $96,000 a year.
Co-op maintenance fee: $96,000 a year.
Nanny: $45,000 a year

living a good life in new york city: priceless pricy 
[photo: dalton school by diegodacal]

PRIVATE school: $32,000 a year per student.

Mortgage: $96,000 a year.

Co-op maintenance fee: $96,000 a year.

Nanny: $45,000 a year

living a good life in new york city: priceless pricy

[photo: dalton school by diegodacal]

The Fifth Avenue Garden at The Frick Collection. 
The Frick is  celebrating its 75th anniversary as a museum this year, having opened in  1935. The garden was also designed in 1935.
(nysd)

The Fifth Avenue Garden at The Frick Collection.

The Frick is celebrating its 75th anniversary as a museum this year, having opened in 1935. The garden was also designed in 1935.

(nysd)

noted
(at 74th st and 2nd ave.)

noted

(at 74th st and 2nd ave.)