NYPL’s Ottendorfer Library opened in 1884 as NYC’s first free public  library. The landmark library is one of the oldest in the system. 

Designed by German-born architect William Schickel, this landmark  building combines Queen Anne and neo-Italian Renaissance styles with an  exterior ornamented by innovative terracotta putti. The Branch was a  gift of Oswald Ottendorfer, owner of the New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung. At  the time, the neighborhood was called Kleindeutschland (Little Germany)  and had a population of over 150,000 people of German descent.  Ottendorfer wished to provide this community with books to cultivate  their minds and assist assimilation into American culture. … the branch continues to reflect its community and  remains a vital educational and cultural resource for the East Village  today. NYPL on 4sq

(top photo via German Traces NYC)

NYPL’s Ottendorfer Library opened in 1884 as NYC’s first free public library. The landmark library is one of the oldest in the system. 

Designed by German-born architect William Schickel, this landmark building combines Queen Anne and neo-Italian Renaissance styles with an exterior ornamented by innovative terracotta putti. The Branch was a gift of Oswald Ottendorfer, owner of the New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung. At the time, the neighborhood was called Kleindeutschland (Little Germany) and had a population of over 150,000 people of German descent. Ottendorfer wished to provide this community with books to cultivate their minds and assist assimilation into American culture. … the branch continues to reflect its community and remains a vital educational and cultural resource for the East Village today.
NYPL on 4sq

(top photo via German Traces NYC)

notjimjoe:

JJ and the infamous AP/PA in the E.V. courtesy of E-squared. (NY people send me your shots, notjimjoe@gmail.com)

at 10th st. and 1st ave. by yours truly (ahem, ahem)

notjimjoe:

JJ and the infamous AP/PA in the E.V. courtesy of E-squared. (NY people send me your shots, notjimjoe@gmail.com)

at 10th st. and 1st ave. by yours truly (ahem, ahem)

more of what was there — East Village (NW corner of Lafayette St. and E.Houston St.) then [1929] and now

more of what was there — East Village (NW corner of Lafayette St. and E.Houston St.) then [1929] and now

Bordeaux Restaurant Week starts today (thru Nov. 21)
the mermaid inn and yerba buena are two ev restaurants that are participating. map of participating restaurants here.
(photo via nyt)

Bordeaux Restaurant Week starts today (thru Nov. 21)

the mermaid inn and yerba buena are two ev restaurants that are participating. map of participating restaurants here.

(photo via nyt)

"… it seems to me that sex in the Village is like sex anywhere. It is where you find it, and the more you look for it, the less likely you are apt to succeed. … Women ar [sic] not met. They are encountered…usually under circumstances that preclude anything beyond a mild hand-hold in the shared taxi from Idlewild.
Females in the Village APPEAR to be more willing than other New York women, but they bog down in debate, procrastination, and unabashed scratching which does less than little toward furthering romance. They are generally sharp without being intelligent, knowing without being knowledgeable, literary without being seductive. For good measure, permit me to throw in one more fault: they are too bloody self centered.”
More Sex Advice for Village Single Girl (Village Voice, August 9, 1962)
(photo via new york portraits)

"… it seems to me that sex in the Village is like sex anywhere. It is where you find it, and the more you look for it, the less likely you are apt to succeed. … Women ar [sic] not met. They are encountered…usually under circumstances that preclude anything beyond a mild hand-hold in the shared taxi from Idlewild.

Females in the Village APPEAR to be more willing than other New York women, but they bog down in debate, procrastination, and unabashed scratching which does less than little toward furthering romance. They are generally sharp without being intelligent, knowing without being knowledgeable, literary without being seductive. For good measure, permit me to throw in one more fault: they are too bloody self centered.”

More Sex Advice for Village Single Girl (Village Voice, August 9, 1962)

(photo via new york portraits)

Halloween Events at Merchant’s House Museum — ‘‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’’
Candlelight Ghost Tours of ‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’ Thursday–Saturday, October 27-29, 6-9:30 p.m.
From Parlor to Grave: 1865 Funeral ReenactmentThe parlors will be draped in black crape as we recreate the  1865 funeral of Seabury Tredwell. After the service, mourners are  invited to follow the coffin to nearby New York City Marble Cemetery – rarely open to the public – for a tour. 19th-century mourning attire encouraged; black crape armbands will be provided. Sunday, October 30, 3 to 5 p.m.
Spine Tingling and True: Ghost Stories of the Merchant’s House Museum selections from 19th-century horror classics, and tell  of the many strange and supernatural occurrences at the Merchant’s House  Museum – in a parlor arranged for a mid-19th century funeral. Monday, October 31, 7 & 8:30 p.m.

Halloween Events at Merchant’s House Museum — ‘‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’’

Candlelight Ghost Tours of ‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’ Thursday–Saturday, October 27-29, 6-9:30 p.m.

From Parlor to Grave: 1865 Funeral Reenactment
The parlors will be draped in black crape as we recreate the 1865 funeral of Seabury Tredwell. After the service, mourners are invited to follow the coffin to nearby New York City Marble Cemetery – rarely open to the public – for a tour. 19th-century mourning attire encouraged; black crape armbands will be provided. Sunday, October 30, 3 to 5 p.m.

Spine Tingling and True: Ghost Stories of the Merchant’s House Museum
selections from 19th-century horror classics, and tell of the many strange and supernatural occurrences at the Merchant’s House Museum – in a parlor arranged for a mid-19th century funeral. Monday, October 31, 7 & 8:30 p.m.

at think coffee (bowery and bleecker st.)

at think coffee (bowery and bleecker st.)

(at karma)

(at karma)

Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979
Ignited in part by the changes in music, art  and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a  cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the  neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had  been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.
Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979

Ignited in part by the changes in music, art and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.

Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

today (actually, yesterday) in photos of abandoned bra hanging from a walk/don’t walk sign on 2nd ave.
evgif:

http://evgrieve.com/2011/09/today-in-photos-of-abandoned-bra-ion.html

today (actually, yesterday) in photos of abandoned bra hanging from a walk/don’t walk sign on 2nd ave.

evgif:

http://evgrieve.com/2011/09/today-in-photos-of-abandoned-bra-ion.html

the fence outside St. Mark’s Church became an old-time fruit stand
stuyvesant square transformed into a rainy day in paris in the 1920’s (gvshp)
not really related: six ways to feel French in New York City

the fence outside St. Mark’s Church became an old-time fruit stand

stuyvesant square transformed into a rainy day in paris in the 1920’s (gvshp)

not really related: six ways to feel French in New York City

book discussion of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins tonight at 6pm at Tompkins Square Library
(illustration via)

book discussion of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins tonight at 6pm at Tompkins Square Library

(illustration via)

alphagirl:

Back on our indie bookstore tour, we’ve got the East Village’s St. Mark’s Bookshop, deceptively not actually on St. Mark’s Place but on 3rd Avenue between 8th and 9th. This one will be brief.
In this city, I’d put St. Mark’s second only to (maybe even on par with) Book Culture for a thinking person’s book selection. They have an extensive “critical theory” section placed front and center, which should tell you something about the place right off the bat. St. Mark’s other strengths are its selections of sociology, art books, literary graphic novels, anarchist works, and poetry. Though there’s no seating to speak of, but the shelves create private hideaways such that one can sit on the floor browsing for hours, and the people-watching is solid. Final boon: this place is very plugged in to literary events in the neighborhood, and its bulletin board and stacks of event fliers are a goldmine.

save the St. Mark’s Bookshop

previously

alphagirl:

Back on our indie bookstore tour, we’ve got the East Village’s St. Mark’s Bookshop, deceptively not actually on St. Mark’s Place but on 3rd Avenue between 8th and 9th. This one will be brief.

In this city, I’d put St. Mark’s second only to (maybe even on par with) Book Culture for a thinking person’s book selection. They have an extensive “critical theory” section placed front and center, which should tell you something about the place right off the bat. St. Mark’s other strengths are its selections of sociology, art books, literary graphic novels, anarchist works, and poetry. Though there’s no seating to speak of, but the shelves create private hideaways such that one can sit on the floor browsing for hours, and the people-watching is solid. Final boon: this place is very plugged in to literary events in the neighborhood, and its bulletin board and stacks of event fliers are a goldmine.

save the St. Mark’s Bookshop

previously