See Greenpoint Ave. right there, running across that Queens neighborhood? I say Sunnyside will be the next neighborhood to be gentrified/homogenized/suburbanized/mallified by the hipsters or otherwise.

New York Magazine did put Sunnyside as the 3rd most livable neighborhood in NYC.

It’s a leafy quiet neighborhood and has the feel of a quaint little town. It has affordable rents, lots of Irish pubs and ethnic restaurants, and an old school movie theater, Center Cinemas, showing first-run films for $5 matinee, and $7 regular price. Nightlife is somewhat lacking but it’s only minutes away from Greenpoint, Long Island City, Astoria, and Uptown and midtown Manhattan. It has the feel and reminds me of pre-gentrified/NYU’d East Village.

Hope I just didn’t put a death knell to this neighborhood.
Also, do these 50 things before Queens gets completely gentrified.

See Greenpoint Ave. right there, running across that Queens neighborhood? I say Sunnyside will be the next neighborhood to be gentrified/homogenized/suburbanized/mallified by the hipsters or otherwise.

New York Magazine did put Sunnyside as the 3rd most livable neighborhood in NYC.

It’s a leafy quiet neighborhood and has the feel of a quaint little town. It has affordable rents, lots of Irish pubs and ethnic restaurants, and an old school movie theater, Center Cinemas, showing first-run films for $5 matinee, and $7 regular price. Nightlife is somewhat lacking but it’s only minutes away from Greenpoint, Long Island City, Astoria, and Uptown and midtown Manhattan. It has the feel and reminds me of pre-gentrified/NYU’d East Village.

Hope I just didn’t put a death knell to this neighborhood.

Also, do these 50 things before Queens gets completely gentrified.

In honor of this year being the Year of the Dragon, here’s the trailer for the 1985 film with that same title, featuring NYC when it had grit and character, and Chinatown before the hipsterfication and fast approaching gentrification.

a video about the doucheoisie. It hails from Arlington, VA, but it could be about Anywhere, NYC

(h/t JVNY)

Shopping for LPs in the many villages of downtown New York City 
[back in 1997 when records still mattered, before gentrification]
All Sales Are Vinyl (the Atlantic)
Related: Record Stores Fight to Be Long-Playing (NYT)

Shopping for LPs in the many villages of downtown New York City

[back in 1997 when records still mattered, before gentrification]

All Sales Are Vinyl (the Atlantic)

Related: Record Stores Fight to Be Long-Playing (NYT)


“It feels as if a layer has been peeled back on New York,” Haley M.  Rubin, 23, an advertising assistant account executive in Manhattan, said  in an e-mail message. “When I’m out in bars and restaurants, there is a  sheen that is missing. Not to say New York isn’t still exciting and  fun, but it feels a little grittier; there is a sense that the thrill of  paying $20 for a cocktail is over. I find that my friends are still  going out and want to have fun but their tolerance for the ‘price of  exclusivity’ has waned.”

(photo: Robert Stolarik for The New York Times)

“It feels as if a layer has been peeled back on New York,” Haley M. Rubin, 23, an advertising assistant account executive in Manhattan, said in an e-mail message. “When I’m out in bars and restaurants, there is a sheen that is missing. Not to say New York isn’t still exciting and fun, but it feels a little grittier; there is a sense that the thrill of paying $20 for a cocktail is over. I find that my friends are still going out and want to have fun but their tolerance for the ‘price of exclusivity’ has waned.”

(photo: Robert Stolarik for The New York Times)

An abandoned building in Alphabet City, June 1986. (photo: Q. Sakamaki/NYT)

"Before long he gravitated toward Tompkins Square, the neighborhood’s  central gathering spot, where he found a lively mix of people. There  were law students, punks, poets and older, lifelong residents who could  remember the days of the New Deal.”

East Village, Before the Gentry

An abandoned building in Alphabet City, June 1986. (photo: Q. Sakamaki/NYT)

"Before long he gravitated toward Tompkins Square, the neighborhood’s central gathering spot, where he found a lively mix of people. There were law students, punks, poets and older, lifelong residents who could remember the days of the New Deal.”

East Village, Before the Gentry


"The mayor’s domestication of Manhattan has gone far enough. It’s there  in the nanny-state bans on foods, sodas and ciggies; the redesign of  nasty, grotty, thrill-a-minute Times Square into a holding pen for  clueless tourists; the move of the Washington Square fountain 22 feet to  the east so it aligns with the arch and Fifth Avenue; even the routing  of quirky neighborhood retailers and their replacement by Duane Reades,  bank branches and chain stores…
Enough with domestication. New Yorkers don’t want to be domesticated.  We don’t want safe. We sometimes like scary. We don’t even always want  clean. We’re not afraid of what’s around the corner; we rush toward it.  It’s a defining characteristic, even in our bikers—darting in and out of  traffic, when they aren’t whizzing by you in the wrong direction on the  rare day that they do use those bike lanes. “[We’re] skilled  professionals, wild, hell-bent acrobatic messengers,” said Jeremiah  Moss, the blogger at Vanishing New York, not “three-speed country  tootlers decked out in color-coordinated bike gear.”
Danger is our  business, or at least it used to be.
(crain’s new york)

(pic via wsj)

"The mayor’s domestication of Manhattan has gone far enough. It’s there in the nanny-state bans on foods, sodas and ciggies; the redesign of nasty, grotty, thrill-a-minute Times Square into a holding pen for clueless tourists; the move of the Washington Square fountain 22 feet to the east so it aligns with the arch and Fifth Avenue; even the routing of quirky neighborhood retailers and their replacement by Duane Reades, bank branches and chain stores…

Enough with domestication. New Yorkers don’t want to be domesticated. We don’t want safe. We sometimes like scary. We don’t even always want clean. We’re not afraid of what’s around the corner; we rush toward it. It’s a defining characteristic, even in our bikers—darting in and out of traffic, when they aren’t whizzing by you in the wrong direction on the rare day that they do use those bike lanes. “[We’re] skilled professionals, wild, hell-bent acrobatic messengers,” said Jeremiah Moss, the blogger at Vanishing New York, not “three-speed country tootlers decked out in color-coordinated bike gear.”

Danger is our business, or at least it used to be.

(crain’s new york)

(pic via wsj)

"I feel sad and angry that the only newcomers to Manhattan from now on will be those rich enough to buy their way in. No new immigrants will bring their ways and flavors and styles to our neighborhoods. No poor artists or writers or musicians will come here and fight to prove their worth. No struggle, no adventure — just pay to stay."
~Maggie Wrigley on The Suburbanization of New York
(photo via ev grieve)

"I feel sad and angry that the only newcomers to Manhattan from now on will be those rich enough to buy their way in. No new immigrants will bring their ways and flavors and styles to our neighborhoods. No poor artists or writers or musicians will come here and fight to prove their worth. No struggle, no adventure — just pay to stay."

~Maggie Wrigley on The Suburbanization of New York

(photo via ev grieve)

the former George Herdt’s bar [now cafe cluny] at west 12th and west 4th sts., way before the far West Village became trendy (via ephemeral ny)

the former George Herdt’s bar [now cafe cluny] at west 12th and west 4th sts., way before the far West Village became trendy (via ephemeral ny)


As the crowds gathered, a doorman at a faded rental complex nearby  watched from an elderly resident’s spacious 20th-floor apartment. “People were paying $25 just  to see that view for 15 minutes,” the doorman at 220 Central Park South  recalled. “And I’m just sitting there, just looking out. To think, it’s  the best view in the city and he’s got it for free, every day!” 
Those days are numbered. Last month, tenants in 26 rent-stabilized  units at 220 CPS ended their five-year battle to hold on to their  perfect view, selling out to developers for a total of $40 million, … completing Central Park’s  transformation from a desirable address to one that’s out of  reach for everyone but the über-rich.

The  Last Citadel: Central Park’s Gated Community Nearly Complete (nyo)

As the crowds gathered, a doorman at a faded rental complex nearby watched from an elderly resident’s spacious 20th-floor apartment. “People were paying $25 just to see that view for 15 minutes,” the doorman at 220 Central Park South recalled. “And I’m just sitting there, just looking out. To think, it’s the best view in the city and he’s got it for free, every day!”

Those days are numbered. Last month, tenants in 26 rent-stabilized units at 220 CPS ended their five-year battle to hold on to their perfect view, selling out to developers for a total of $40 million, … completing Central Park’s transformation from a desirable address to one that’s out of reach for everyone but the über-rich.

The Last Citadel: Central Park’s Gated Community Nearly Complete (nyo)

café charbon to close (more on bowery boogie and ev grieve)
 (pic via goggla)

café charbon to close (more on bowery boogie and ev grieve)

(pic via goggla)

first victim of gentrification on the bowery. vanished oct. 2006, now a varvatos store

"a little window into nyc during this time period — the 1970s: a dreary, very uneasy time in the city’s history. it thrived precisely because the city was in decline during the time when the most creative and innovative people were drawn to the lower east side for its edginess, its cheap rents, and its debauchery…”
CBGB  & OMFUG: Punk music history  on the Bowery
(listen to the podcast here, one of the bowery boys’s podcasts in 2010)

(and just in case you didn’t know)
cbgb = country blue grass and blues
omfug = other music  for uplifting gormandizers
(image via)

first victim of gentrification on the bowery. vanished oct. 2006, now a varvatos store

"a little window into nyc during this time period — the 1970s: a dreary, very uneasy time in the city’s history. it thrived precisely because the city was in decline during the time when the most creative and innovative people were drawn to the lower east side for its edginess, its cheap rents, and its debauchery…”

CBGB & OMFUG: Punk music history on the Bowery

(listen to the podcast here, one of the bowery boys’s podcasts in 2010)

(and just in case you didn’t know)

cbgb = country blue grass and blues

omfug = other music for uplifting gormandizers

(image via)

"the change of the New York accents to a linear California valley-girl  type accent full of "likes" and phrasing everything in the form of a  question"— (commenter Eric K                   from Sheepshead Bay)
"it’s sad that the new york accent is becoming extinct…i miss the flat vowels and the drop Rs at the end of the word, and i think the uptalking is the worst trend amongst the 20, and 30 somethings too; it’s awful we all talk in the same way" — (amy sohn, author of prospect park west)
they used to say that 1 out of 7 people in the country can trace their roots out of brooklyn; today, 1 out of 7 people in brooklyn are from ohio. —(steve hindy, co-founder of brooklyn brewery)
signs of a gentrifying neighborhood when you have to look down and keep  your eyes on the sidewalk [for dogs].
"Most of the trends they refer to are trends that "Hipsters" have brought  over the bridge. They say they love living in Brooklyn more than the  city but bring everything the city offers here. If they truly love  Brooklyn, let it remain Brooklyn and build and improve on what’s great  about the largest borough in the nation––not turn it into a mini  Manhattan." — (commenter Rose)
brooklyn trend pieces (wnyc)
(image via)
  • "the change of the New York accents to a linear California valley-girl type accent full of "likes" and phrasing everything in the form of a question"— (commenter Eric K from Sheepshead Bay)
  • "it’s sad that the new york accent is becoming extinct…i miss the flat vowels and the drop Rs at the end of the word, and i think the uptalking is the worst trend amongst the 20, and 30 somethings too; it’s awful we all talk in the same way" — (amy sohn, author of prospect park west)
  • they used to say that 1 out of 7 people in the country can trace their roots out of brooklyn; today, 1 out of 7 people in brooklyn are from ohio. —(steve hindy, co-founder of brooklyn brewery)
  • signs of a gentrifying neighborhood when you have to look down and keep your eyes on the sidewalk [for dogs].
  • "Most of the trends they refer to are trends that "Hipsters" have brought over the bridge. They say they love living in Brooklyn more than the city but bring everything the city offers here. If they truly love Brooklyn, let it remain Brooklyn and build and improve on what’s great about the largest borough in the nation––not turn it into a mini Manhattan." — (commenter Rose)

brooklyn trend pieces (wnyc)

(image via)