at the now vanished Le Figaro Café — a bohemian hangout, a symbol of the old Greenwich Village and of a time when good conversation had more value than rotting in front of a television set.” (or smartphones)

[now a Qdoba and a bank, of course]


(Google Maps)

(B&W photos of Le Figaro Café via NYU archives; Color photos via New York Magazine)

Washington Square Arch, Manhattan Skyline and Washington Square Park, Aerial View, undated
from New York University Archives: Guide to the Washington Square Park and Washington Square Area Image Collection, 1850-1990 (h/t Bowery Boogie via Flaming Pablum)

Washington Square Arch, Manhattan Skyline and Washington Square Park, Aerial View, undated

from New York University Archives: Guide to the Washington Square Park and Washington Square Area Image Collection, 1850-1990 (h/t Bowery Boogie via Flaming Pablum)

An appreciation of something that hasn’t vanished yet in NYC — the farmhouse at 121 Charles Street. Am hoping that this won’t be razed soon, or ever, to make way for another soulless glass condo.
from Maeve Brennan’s The Farmhouse That Moved Downtown:


"It was up in the air, a ghost shape, at the end of the block, on the northeast corner of Charles Street and Greenwich Street. The eastern wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall, facing Charles Street is white, and as I approached it I got a sidewise glimmer of it that defined the whole tiny structure. It was a very tiny house — much smaller than I had expected. That must have been a very small farmer who built it. It was sitting up high on a sturdy cage, or raft, of heavy wooden beams, on a wedge-shaped, weedy lot, with the old brick warehouses towering over it like burly nurse-maids. It was a crooked little house — askew on its perch but crooked anyway — and it looked as plain and as insubstantial as a child’s chalk drawing, but it was a real house, with real windows and a real odor, and a flat roof with a chimney sticking out of it. … It is a very private place, with those big walls to the north and east, and with warehouses across both streets, Charles and Greenwich, but I saw domestic lights in the tall windows of the house diagonally across from the farmhouse, on Greenwich Street, and there are people living in the houses going back toward Hudson Street, so it is not deserted there at night or during the weekends. The house could hardly have found a better place to settle in.”


(photos via NYDP. more pics of the farmhouse here, not here, but also here)

An appreciation of something that hasn’t vanished yet in NYC — the farmhouse at 121 Charles Street. Am hoping that this won’t be razed soon, or ever, to make way for another soulless glass condo.

from Maeve Brennan’s The Farmhouse That Moved Downtown:

"It was up in the air, a ghost shape, at the end of the block, on the northeast corner of Charles Street and Greenwich Street. The eastern wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall of the farmhouse is painted a dark color, but the front wall, facing Charles Street is white, and as I approached it I got a sidewise glimmer of it that defined the whole tiny structure. It was a very tiny house — much smaller than I had expected. That must have been a very small farmer who built it. It was sitting up high on a sturdy cage, or raft, of heavy wooden beams, on a wedge-shaped, weedy lot, with the old brick warehouses towering over it like burly nurse-maids. It was a crooked little house — askew on its perch but crooked anyway — and it looked as plain and as insubstantial as a child’s chalk drawing, but it was a real house, with real windows and a real odor, and a flat roof with a chimney sticking out of it. … It is a very private place, with those big walls to the north and east, and with warehouses across both streets, Charles and Greenwich, but I saw domestic lights in the tall windows of the house diagonally across from the farmhouse, on Greenwich Street, and there are people living in the houses going back toward Hudson Street, so it is not deserted there at night or during the weekends. The house could hardly have found a better place to settle in.”

(photos via NYDP. more pics of the farmhouse here, not here, but also here)

Bleecker Street Cinema

"One of Allen’s most poignant films, Crimes and  			Misdemeanors posed deeply philosophical questions of moral absolutes  			(cut with several comedic layers, including a brilliant turn by Alan  			Alda as a successful television producer). The themes of morals,  			values and ethics were played out across a wide Manhattan stage,  			including the Bleecker Street Cinema in Greenwich Village.  			Unfortunately, the theater no longer exists (it had been located at  			144 Bleecker Street and is now a video store Duane Reade and a stationery store). In the film, this is  			where Woody takes his niece to see movies he feels will make her a  			better person. (The theater is also where Aidan Quinn worked as a  			projectionist in the Madonna movie, Desperately Seeking Susan.)”

a  		Woody Allen walking tour of New York City

Bleecker Street Cinema

"One of Allen’s most poignant films, Crimes and Misdemeanors posed deeply philosophical questions of moral absolutes (cut with several comedic layers, including a brilliant turn by Alan Alda as a successful television producer). The themes of morals, values and ethics were played out across a wide Manhattan stage, including the Bleecker Street Cinema in Greenwich Village. Unfortunately, the theater no longer exists (it had been located at 144 Bleecker Street and is now a video store Duane Reade and a stationery store). In the film, this is where Woody takes his niece to see movies he feels will make her a better person. (The theater is also where Aidan Quinn worked as a projectionist in the Madonna movie, Desperately Seeking Susan.)”

a Woody Allen walking tour of New York City

Shopping for LPs in the many villages of downtown New York City 
[back in 1997 when records still mattered, before gentrification]
All Sales Are Vinyl (the Atlantic)
Related: Record Stores Fight to Be Long-Playing (NYT)

Shopping for LPs in the many villages of downtown New York City

[back in 1997 when records still mattered, before gentrification]

All Sales Are Vinyl (the Atlantic)

Related: Record Stores Fight to Be Long-Playing (NYT)

Spring Night, Greenwich Village, 1930, by Martin Lewis

At the time Lewis made Spring Night, Greenwich Village he lived at 111  Bedford Street (which may be the street depicted in the print), in the  Village, and was immersed in the intellectual and artistic life of the  neighborhood. 

(artnet via ephemeral new york)

Spring Night, Greenwich Village, 1930, by Martin Lewis

At the time Lewis made Spring Night, Greenwich Village he lived at 111 Bedford Street (which may be the street depicted in the print), in the Village, and was immersed in the intellectual and artistic life of the neighborhood.

(artnet via ephemeral new york)

Stephen Sondheim at the piano in the  mid-1930s.

bookbook's bestseller list these days
Hardcovers:Life by Keith RichardsObject of Beauty by Steve MartinAutobiography of Mark TwainFinishing the Hat by Stephen SondheimCleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff
Paperbacks:Just Kids by Patti SmithThe Fran Lebowitz ReaderThe Finkler Question by Howard  JacobsonThe Imperfectionists by  Tom RachmanInside of a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz

checking in on bookbook (jvny)

Stephen Sondheim at the piano in the mid-1930s.

bookbook's bestseller list these days

Hardcovers:
Life by Keith Richards
Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Autobiography of Mark Twain
Finishing the Hat by Stephen Sondheim
Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff

Paperbacks:
Just Kids by Patti Smith
The Fran Lebowitz Reader
The Finkler Question by Howard Jacobson
The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman
Inside of a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz

checking in on bookbook (jvny)


scene from alfred hitchcock’s rear window [set in greenwich village in 1954 during a sweltering summer of open  windows]

scene from alfred hitchcock’s rear window [set in greenwich village in 1954 during a sweltering summer of open windows]

The City from Greenwich          Village (1922), by John Sloan

Sloan’s painting conveys a nostalgic, romanticized mood, one that  contrasts strongly with the scenes of tenement life, teeming city streets, and desolate  back alleys that he and fellow members of the “Ash Can School” had produced during  the first decade of the century.
The artist’s ambiguous reference to “moonshine” on the billboard in  the left foreground both documents the city’s commercialization and lends a poetic aura to  the scene.
(National Gallery of Art)

(click here for the “Ash Can School” version of the painting)

The City from Greenwich Village (1922), by John Sloan

Sloan’s painting conveys a nostalgic, romanticized mood, one that contrasts strongly with the scenes of tenement life, teeming city streets, and desolate back alleys that he and fellow members of the “Ash Can School” had produced during the first decade of the century.

The artist’s ambiguous reference to “moonshine” on the billboard in the left foreground both documents the city’s commercialization and lends a poetic aura to the scene.

(National Gallery of Art)

(click here for the “Ash Can School” version of the painting)

New York the Way It Was: Greenwich VillageA nostalgic documentary, highlighting the spirit of a time that won’t be forgotten(PBS/WLIW)

New York the Way It Was: Greenwich Village
A nostalgic documentary, highlighting the spirit of a time that won’t be forgotten
(PBS/WLIW)

A 1921 cartoon, courtesy of Duke University, shows a displaced artist  walking past Vincent Pepe, an Italian-born real estate entrepreneur, and  two rich clients in search of a Village home. 

A 1921 cartoon, courtesy of Duke University, shows a displaced artist walking past Vincent Pepe, an Italian-born real estate entrepreneur, and two rich clients in search of a Village home. 

seems to be a village fave for halloween, fall, or any day
(spotted at a sex/tattoo shop in the greenwich village — 6th ave. near w. 4th st.)

seems to be a village fave for halloween, fall, or any day

(spotted at a sex/tattoo shop in the greenwich village — 6th ave. near w. 4th st.)

biography bookshop was replaced by this?
related:
Wow. So Witty. (I L♥’d New York.)

biography bookshop was replaced by this?

related:

Wow. So Witty. (I L♥’d New York.)