Jack Tworkov’s ‘West 23rd,
'Abstract Expressionist New York', Museum of Modern Art, Oct.  3-April 25

For this exhibit, MoMA  is hauling out 300 works by 30 artists who worked in the titular  style—the first that the institution was around to really collect.  Almost all of the art will come from the museum’s own collection.  Well-known examples of painting, sculpture and photography—made mostly  from the 1940s to the ’60s—will be presented alongside works by more  obscure artists. Shown in 25,000 square feet of gallery space, it’s an  exhibit to dive into.
(wsj)
Jack Tworkov’s ‘West 23rd,

'Abstract Expressionist New York', Museum of Modern Art, Oct. 3-April 25

For this exhibit, MoMA is hauling out 300 works by 30 artists who worked in the titular style—the first that the institution was around to really collect. Almost all of the art will come from the museum’s own collection. Well-known examples of painting, sculpture and photography—made mostly from the 1940s to the ’60s—will be presented alongside works by more obscure artists. Shown in 25,000 square feet of gallery space, it’s an exhibit to dive into.

(wsj)

lilyna:

Jean-Luc Godard’s Weekend to play at MOMA this week!

This is one of my favorite scene. It has a lot to do with the fact that Jean-Pierre Léaud (yes, that 400 coups guy) is singing a love plead into a telephone. 

Not to be miss (as in not available on DVD), this 1967 movie from the acclaimed (especially by me) French nouvelle vague director Jean-Luc Godard will be playing on August 8th at 2:30 pm. I will be out of town…but my fellow intriguing-cinema lovers here in NY should definitely go.

Wish i could describe it better than the MOMA does: 

“A ferocious satire of modern life, Weekend begins with a couple leaving Paris for a weekend in the country—only to find themselves, like everyone else, stuck in a traffic jam of Armageddon-like proportions.” 

I also consider Weekend to be the cinematographic moment when Godard’s aesthetic changed form the weirdly modern done in color-block grandiose with a heavy dose of profound but slightly amusing philosophical musing (Une femme est une femme, Pierrot le fou, Le Mépris) to the more intricately implicated, socially conscious and socialist enclined movies like La Chinoise and the deeply (and not sure it’s in a good way) hermetic Le Gai savoir.

I’d pair it in a double feature with Luis Bunuel’s The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (and this should be endorsment enough), a surrealistic and cynic look (and slap) at upper-middle-class in France in the early 70’s. Religion, Food, Sex, Politic, and many inexplicable “this is art!” moments. It’s a real pleasure to watch and digest. and this movie, Weekend, is from what I remember (early college days) a puzzling treat…and pretty much where me and Godard part way. Not really into that complicated experimental phase he went on after, I kind of have a preference for his “Karina years”…and this still has some perfume of it. 

It’s also the movie he wrote when he and Anna Karina parted ways. Have your Freudian way with that.