[The Progress of Love] The Pursuit, 1773, Jean-Honore Fragonard
You know, back then, this was considered romantic. But today this would be considered stalking and that guy will probably get a restraining order or arrested from pursuing that girl.
Anyway, speaking of Fragonard…
The Fragonard Room is a personal favorite at The Frick Collection. The highlight of the room are the panels by Fragonard, but the room is also furnished with tables, chairs and other decorative objects from the 18th century. 
[Frick Conservation]
Whenever I go to The Frick, which is often (perk of being a member), I head straight to this room and just linger and admire the beautiful panels. It’s a place where I can be alone with my thoughts, in solitude, and just daydream that I am an aristocrat and that this room is where I read books and listen to Bach.
Remember that Twilight Zone episode starring Robert Duvall, where his character keeps going to a museum to see the dollhouse, which comes alive when he’s there, and eventually in the end, he ended up in the dollhouse? 
Often times I wish this would happen to me where I become part of one of the panels, if not the room.
More of The Progress of Love here, here, not here, but also here.

[The Progress of Love] The Pursuit, 1773, Jean-Honore Fragonard

You know, back then, this was considered romantic. But today this would be considered stalking and that guy will probably get a restraining order or arrested from pursuing that girl.

Anyway, speaking of Fragonard…

The Fragonard Room is a personal favorite at The Frick Collection. The highlight of the room are the panels by Fragonard, but the room is also furnished with tables, chairs and other decorative objects from the 18th century. 


[Frick Conservation]

Whenever I go to The Frick, which is often (perk of being a member), I head straight to this room and just linger and admire the beautiful panels. It’s a place where I can be alone with my thoughts, in solitude, and just daydream that I am an aristocrat and that this room is where I read books and listen to Bach.

Remember that Twilight Zone episode starring Robert Duvall, where his character keeps going to a museum to see the dollhouse, which comes alive when he’s there, and eventually in the end, he ended up in the dollhouse?

Often times I wish this would happen to me where I become part of one of the panels, if not the room.

More of The Progress of Love here, here, not here, but also here.

La Promenade, 1870, Pierre-August Renoir 
Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length PaintingFebruary 7, 2012, through May 13, 2012 at The Frick Collection

The Frick Collection will present an exhibition of nine iconic Impressionist paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, offering the first comprehensive study of the artist’s engagement with the full-length format, which was associated with the official Paris Salon in the decade that saw the emergence of a fully fledged Impressionist aesthetic. The project was inspired by La Promenade of 1875–76, the most significant Impressionist work in the Frick’s permanent collection.

Related: Renoir at the Frick (WSJ)

La Promenade, 1870, Pierre-August Renoir

Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting
February 7, 2012, through May 13, 2012 at The Frick Collection

The Frick Collection will present an exhibition of nine iconic Impressionist paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, offering the first comprehensive study of the artist’s engagement with the full-length format, which was associated with the official Paris Salon in the decade that saw the emergence of a fully fledged Impressionist aesthetic. The project was inspired by La Promenade of 1875–76, the most significant Impressionist work in the Frick’s permanent collection.

Related: Renoir at the Frick (WSJ)

View of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum from Fifth ave. looking southeast, New York, ca. 1950 (photo: Robert Mates)
A Timeline of the Guggenheim Museum, 1943-1959

View of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum from Fifth ave. looking southeast, New York, ca. 1950 (photo: Robert Mates)

A Timeline of the Guggenheim Museum, 1943-1959

Jules on St. Mark’s  (photo: Tyler Hicks/The New York Times)
“The East Village is a state of mind, not a place.”

Jules on St. Mark’s  (photo: Tyler Hicks/The New York Times)

The East Village is a state of mind, not a place.

at Myers of Keswick  (634 Hudson St., bet. Horation and Jane Sts.)
Baked beans, bangers and fried eggs: They are just some of the elements  of a traditional English breakfast. And that’s exactly the kind of  traditional fare many New Yorkers have been stocking up on for their  royal wedding watch parties.
New Yorkers Stock Up for Royal Wedding Viewing Parties (WNYC)
(photo via)

at Myers of Keswick  (634 Hudson St., bet. Horation and Jane Sts.)

Baked beans, bangers and fried eggs: They are just some of the elements of a traditional English breakfast. And that’s exactly the kind of traditional fare many New Yorkers have been stocking up on for their royal wedding watch parties.

New Yorkers Stock Up for Royal Wedding Viewing Parties (WNYC)

(photo via)

at Nei’ls Coffee Shop (a throwback the the old days)
(pic via WithoutFins via Miss Heather)

at Nei’ls Coffee Shop (a throwback the the old days)

(pic via WithoutFins via Miss Heather)

The West Gallery of The Frick Collection.

"At a time when museums large and small are in various states of  transition—scrambling for funds, undergoing makeovers, trimming the  budget or planning the next blockbuster—the mansion and collection  established by Henry Clay Frick serenely endures. There have been no  headline-grabbing shows here, no "starchitect" renovations or additions,  not even a modest café or upscale dining venture. Instead, the Frick  Collection quietly attracts a steady stream of about 300,000 visitors  each year who come to see one of the most extraordinary assemblages of  fine and decorative arts in the world, displayed in the home of a robber  baron as famous for his strike-busting ruthlessness as for his  impeccable taste."
— The Frick at a Glowing 75  (wsj)

The West Gallery of The Frick Collection.

"At a time when museums large and small are in various states of transition—scrambling for funds, undergoing makeovers, trimming the budget or planning the next blockbuster—the mansion and collection established by Henry Clay Frick serenely endures. There have been no headline-grabbing shows here, no "starchitect" renovations or additions, not even a modest café or upscale dining venture. Instead, the Frick Collection quietly attracts a steady stream of about 300,000 visitors each year who come to see one of the most extraordinary assemblages of fine and decorative arts in the world, displayed in the home of a robber baron as famous for his strike-busting ruthlessness as for his impeccable taste."

The Frick at a Glowing 75  (wsj)
Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velázquez, “King Philip IV of Spain,”1644,  oil on canvas, 51 1/8 x 39 1/8 inches, The Frick Collection, New York  (before cleaning)

"In conjunction with a focus on Spanish art this fall with the exhibition  The  Spanish Manner: Drawings from Ribera to Goya, the Frick offers  a dossier presentation on the portrait, which returned recently from  The Metropolitan Museum of Art, having been cleaned for the first time  in more than sixty years. The gleaming silver brocade covering the  king’s crimson cassock is executed in a shockingly free and spontaneous  manner, which is almost unparalleled in the painter’s production and can  now be better appreciated.  The treatment by Michael Gallagher, Sherman  Fairchild Conservator in Charge of Paintings Conservation, revealed the  dazzling original surface that had been veiled by a yellowing varnish.”

go.see.it
The King at War: Velázquez’s Portrait of  Philip IVnow thru January 23, 2011 at the frick collection
related: Philip IV, Restored (nyt)

Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velázquez, “King Philip IV of Spain,”1644, oil on canvas, 51 1/8 x 39 1/8 inches, The Frick Collection, New York (before cleaning)

"In conjunction with a focus on Spanish art this fall with the exhibition The Spanish Manner: Drawings from Ribera to Goya, the Frick offers a dossier presentation on the portrait, which returned recently from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, having been cleaned for the first time in more than sixty years. The gleaming silver brocade covering the king’s crimson cassock is executed in a shockingly free and spontaneous manner, which is almost unparalleled in the painter’s production and can now be better appreciated. The treatment by Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge of Paintings Conservation, revealed the dazzling original surface that had been veiled by a yellowing varnish.”

go.see.it

The King at War: Velázquez’s Portrait of Philip IV
now thru January 23, 2011 at the frick collection

related: Philip IV, Restored (nyt)

i’m just gonna camp out in here, during the holidays, at st. dymphna’s (on st. mark’s pl. near ave. a)
my happy place and respite from this holiday, or any other day
[st. dymphna is the patron saint of the mentally ill, so that should explain my affinity to this joint…]

i’m just gonna camp out in here, during the holidays, at st. dymphna’s (on st. mark’s pl. near ave. a)

my happy place and respite from this holiday, or any other day

[st. dymphna is the patron saint of the mentally ill, so that should explain my affinity to this joint…]

The Fifth Avenue Garden at The Frick Collection. 
The Frick is  celebrating its 75th anniversary as a museum this year, having opened in  1935. The garden was also designed in 1935.
(nysd)

The Fifth Avenue Garden at The Frick Collection.

The Frick is celebrating its 75th anniversary as a museum this year, having opened in 1935. The garden was also designed in 1935.

(nysd)