Sunday Lessons

sarahwrotethat:

a fragment after Sebald

The autumn before I had moved just off the park, and I recall the late rosiness of a midwinter Sunday, when the branches that interleave down every street in that section of the city were bare and visible to such a distance in the slantwise light that they lent the grey cracklature of Flemish masters to intersections a half-mile off through which the few cars slid with the appearance of silence, their acceleration impossible to distinguish from the ambient roar even in those years when the city was not so prosperous and many shopfronts remained broken-glassed or boarded, parked cars secured with locks across their steering wheels, and a buttoned-up hurry perceptible in the strides of passersby, less from quickness of their steps than from their hands in pockets or held close to their sides, gazes averted or cast far ahead, tensed and ready muscles palpable in their staccato steps, spines rigid, heads locked into safe angles as if tight against the cold.

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Street Smarts, Will Eisner

"It would be easy and dishonest to view the stories in this book as valentines to the Big City, to New York. And yet, if they are, these are peculiar valentines — a concatenation of unconsummated desires, unmet loves, fates avoided and unavoidable, people damaged and bruised, hopefully or hopelessly on their way to the grave, with or without each other."
~ Neil Gaiman on Will Eisner’s New York

Street Smarts, Will Eisner

"It would be easy and dishonest to view the stories in this book as valentines to the Big City, to New York. And yet, if they are, these are peculiar valentines — a concatenation of unconsummated desires, unmet loves, fates avoided and unavoidable, people damaged and bruised, hopefully or hopelessly on their way to the grave, with or without each other."

~ Neil Gaiman on Will Eisner’s New York

"As I grew older and accumulated more memories, I came to feel more  keenly about the disappearances of people and landmarks. Especially  troubling to me was the callous removal of buildings. I felt that,  somehow, they had a kind of soul. 

I know now that these structures,  barnacled with laughter and stained by tears, are more than lifeless  edifices. It cannot be that having been part of life, they did not  somehow absorb the radiation from human interaction. 

And I wonder what  is left when a building is torn down.”

— from Will Eisner's graphic novel Life in the Big City

"As I grew older and accumulated more memories, I came to feel more keenly about the disappearances of people and landmarks. Especially troubling to me was the callous removal of buildings. I felt that, somehow, they had a kind of soul. 

I know now that these structures, barnacled with laughter and stained by tears, are more than lifeless edifices. It cannot be that having been part of life, they did not somehow absorb the radiation from human interaction. 

And I wonder what is left when a building is torn down.”

— from Will Eisner's graphic novel Life in the Big City

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

The calm before the storm
Hudson River, New York

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

The calm before the storm

Hudson River, New York

sarahwrotethat:

Madison Ave 1911 vs 2010. Photos via Shorpy:

1909: “Madison Avenue and the towers.” Starring the new  Metropolitan Life building. Detroit Publishing glass negative.

2010: looking south from 30th Street by Shorpy user  timeandagainphoto

sarahwrotethat:

Madison Ave 1911 vs 2010. Photos via Shorpy:

1909: “Madison Avenue and the towers.” Starring the new Metropolitan Life building. Detroit Publishing glass negative.

2010: looking south from 30th Street by Shorpy user timeandagainphoto

(via capitalnewyork)

W. Eugene Smith’s view from 821 Sixth Avenue, circa 1957
The W. Eugene Smith and the Jazz Loft Project, photos exhibited at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center last year. But you may still listen to the entire ten-part Sarah Fishko’s episodes,  produced by WNYC, here.

Related:
On and Off the Walls: W. Eugene Smith’s Bohemian  Life (The New Yorker)
Mingus, Monk and Mailer: W Eugene Smith’s Jazz Loft photographs (Guardian UK)

W. Eugene Smith’s view from 821 Sixth Avenue, circa 1957

The W. Eugene Smith and the Jazz Loft Project, photos exhibited at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center last year. But you may still listen to the entire ten-part Sarah Fishko’s episodes, produced by WNYC, here.

Related:

On and Off the Walls: W. Eugene Smith’s Bohemian Life (The New Yorker)

Mingus, Monk and Mailer: W Eugene Smith’s Jazz Loft photographs (Guardian UK)

Album Art

New York, Cat Power

ArtistCat Power
TitleNew York
AlbumJukebox