Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979
Ignited in part by the changes in music, art  and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a  cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the  neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had  been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.
Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979

Ignited in part by the changes in music, art and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.

Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

Saudade

a Portuguese and Galician word for a feeling of nostalgic longing for something or someone that one was fond of and which is lost. It often carries a fatalist tone and a repressed knowledge that the object of longing might really never return.

(this is how i feel most of the time esp. about nyc)

Manhattan’s newsstands present variations on a theme. Each reflects the personality and business acumen of its owner as well as the needs and tastes of its neighborhood. This newsstand on Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard and 135th Street in Harlem sports a well-worn office chair where its owner sits and chats with passers-by. (Photo: Rachel Barrett/New York Times)
"IN 2006, the photographer Rachel Barrett began documenting Manhattan’s newsstands, the makeshift sidewalk stores that sell candy, soda and lottery tickets, as well as newspapers and magazines. To date, she has photographed all 236 that she could find.
Ms. Barrett was drawn to the newsstands because they are ubiquitous and largely taken for granted, and because they forcefully demonstrate that New York, unlike cities whose streets have lost their vitality to car culture, still teems with on-the-run pedestrians.”
Yesterday’s News (nyt)
[Published: July 6, 2008]
[click thru pic for more newsstand photos]

Manhattan’s newsstands present variations on a theme. Each reflects the personality and business acumen of its owner as well as the needs and tastes of its neighborhood. This newsstand on Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard and 135th Street in Harlem sports a well-worn office chair where its owner sits and chats with passers-by. (Photo: Rachel Barrett/New York Times)

"IN 2006, the photographer Rachel Barrett began documenting Manhattan’s newsstands, the makeshift sidewalk stores that sell candy, soda and lottery tickets, as well as newspapers and magazines. To date, she has photographed all 236 that she could find.

Ms. Barrett was drawn to the newsstands because they are ubiquitous and largely taken for granted, and because they forcefully demonstrate that New York, unlike cities whose streets have lost their vitality to car culture, still teems with on-the-run pedestrians.”

Yesterday’s News (nyt)

[Published: July 6, 2008]

[click thru pic for more newsstand photos]

new york city vintage subway car ride

To celebrate the holiday season, MTA New York City Transit is running “Nostalgia Train, starting Sunday, November 30, and every Sunday in December, from 10am to 4pm.


The train runs along the  6th ave. (V) line between the Queens Plaza and Lower East Side 2 Av stations, and features carriages dating back as far the early 1930s, complete with archive adverts, rattan seats and porcelain-covered hand straps.

(pics via urban75)