Saudade (1899), by Almeida Júnior

Saudade (1899), by Almeida Júnior

Intel New York Music Festival, July 16-19, 1997
Club/Music Venues:
- Acme Underground — Closed 2006. Now Ace of Clubs.
- alt.coffee (my favorite 2) — Closed 2007.

Became Hopscotch. Now Sustainable NYC.
- Arlene’s Grocery — Still there.
- The Bottom Line — Closed 2004. Now an NYU academic complex.
- Brownies — Changed it’s name to HiFi, but no more live music.
- CBGB & OMFUG. Do I have to say what happened to this?

- CB’s 313 Gallery — Closed 2006. Became The Morrison Hotel Gallery. And a pop-up clothing store. Now sits empty.
- Coney Island High (my favorite 1) — Closed. Now a sushi and noodle place, and condo apts.

- Continental — Still there, but no longer a punk venue and no more live music. Now with big screen TVs catering to the NYU kids, b&ts, and the urban haute bourgeois.
- The Cooler — Closed 2001. Became RARE, a rock club/bar/restaurant. Now?
- fez (under time cafe) — Closed 2005. Now Chinatown Brasserie.
- Irivng Plaza. Still there. (woo-hoo!)
- Knitting Factory —  Moved to Tribeca in 1994, closed 2008. Now in Brooklyn.  74 Leonard Street still in the market.
- Lions Den —  Closed 2007. Now Sullivan Hall.
- The Mercury Lounge — Still there.
- New Music Cafe — Closed. Became Shine. Now?
- S.O.B’s — Still there.
- Roxy — Closed 2007. Still sitting vacant.
- Tramp’s — Closed 2001. Became Centro Fly. And then Duvet Lounge (popularized by that show). Still vacant and on the market today.
- Vinyl — Closed 200?. Became Arc. Now?
- Wetlands Preserve — Closed 2001. Now a condo.
Good times. Good Times.
Related:
- Top Eleven Since-Closed Live Music Venues in NYC
- New York City Area Concert Venues of the 1990′s
- Avenue A, 1st Avenue, and 2nd Avenue in 1997

Intel New York Music Festival, July 16-19, 1997

Club/Music Venues:

- Acme Underground — Closed 2006. Now Ace of Clubs.

- alt.coffee (my favorite 2) — Closed 2007.

Became Hopscotch. Now Sustainable NYC.

- Arlene’s Grocery — Still there.

- The Bottom LineClosed 2004. Now an NYU academic complex.

- Brownies — Changed it’s name to HiFi, but no more live music.

- CBGB & OMFUG. Do I have to say what happened to this?

- CB’s 313 Gallery — Closed 2006. Became The Morrison Hotel Gallery. And a pop-up clothing store. Now sits empty.

- Coney Island High (my favorite 1) — Closed. Now a sushi and noodle place, and condo apts.

- Continental — Still there, but no longer a punk venue and no more live music. Now with big screen TVs catering to the NYU kids, b&ts, and the urban haute bourgeois.

- The Cooler — Closed 2001. Became RARE, a rock club/bar/restaurant. Now?

- fez (under time cafe) — Closed 2005. Now Chinatown Brasserie.

- Irivng Plaza. Still there. (woo-hoo!)

- Knitting Factory — Moved to Tribeca in 1994, closed 2008. Now in Brooklyn.  74 Leonard Street still in the market.

- Lions Den — Closed 2007. Now Sullivan Hall.

- The Mercury Lounge — Still there.

- New Music Cafe — Closed. Became Shine. Now?

- S.O.B’s — Still there.

- Roxy — Closed 2007. Still sitting vacant.

- Tramp’s — Closed 2001. Became Centro Fly. And then Duvet Lounge (popularized by that show). Still vacant and on the market today.

- Vinyl — Closed 200?. Became Arc. Now?

- Wetlands Preserve — Closed 2001. Now a condo.

Good times. Good Times.

Related:

- Top Eleven Since-Closed Live Music Venues in NYC

- New York City Area Concert Venues of the 1990′s

- Avenue A, 1st Avenue, and 2nd Avenue in 1997

at Baby Doll Lounge circa 1980’s, photograph by Bill Cunningham
vanished sometime in the 2000’s — now a wine bar

at Baby Doll Lounge circa 1980’s, photograph by Bill Cunningham

vanished sometime in the 2000’s now a wine bar

at the former Moondance Diner (80 Sixth Ave., south of Grand St., in SoHo), vanished 2007.
Featured in Spiderman, where Peter Parker ran into Mary Jane while working as a waitress there. The diner was also featured in Scorsese’s After Hours, Friends, and that show that I’m not even going to mention since it ruined NYC.
Now a condo, of course.
(photo via Single Linds Reflex)

at the former Moondance Diner (80 Sixth Ave., south of Grand St., in SoHo), vanished 2007.

Featured in Spiderman, where Peter Parker ran into Mary Jane while working as a waitress there. The diner was also featured in Scorsese’s After Hours, Friends, and that show that I’m not even going to mention since it ruined NYC.

Now a condo, of course.

(photo via Single Linds Reflex)

Washington Square Arch, Manhattan Skyline and Washington Square Park, Aerial View, undated
from New York University Archives: Guide to the Washington Square Park and Washington Square Area Image Collection, 1850-1990 (h/t Bowery Boogie via Flaming Pablum)

Washington Square Arch, Manhattan Skyline and Washington Square Park, Aerial View, undated

from New York University Archives: Guide to the Washington Square Park and Washington Square Area Image Collection, 1850-1990 (h/t Bowery Boogie via Flaming Pablum)

"Nostalgia is denial — denial of the painful present… the name for this denial is golden age thinking — the erroneous notion that a different time period is better than the one one’s living in — it’s a flaw in the romantic imagination of those people who find it difficult to cope with the present."

— [Midnight in Paris]



(LIFE)

"Home Sweet Home" from Electric Company featuring the streets and signs in NYC, c. 1971

Related: [from 1970’s Sesame Street], NYC ABCs making the alphabet using the signs and streets of New York City (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

"New York is a fiction of sorts, a construct, a story, into which you can walk at any moment and at any angle and end up blindsided, turned upside down, changed."

"There is always a part of New York that must keep moving—as if breath itself depends on being frantic, hectic, overwhelmed. I thought to myself that I should just clamber over the snowbank and walk down the other side of the street. But I waited and watched. Snow still fell on the shoveled walkway. Her silver frame slipped and slid. She looked up, caught my eye, gazed down again. There was the quality of the immigrant about her: something dutiful, sad, brave, a certain saudade, a longing for another place.”

~ Colum McCann

My First New York

Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979
Ignited in part by the changes in music, art  and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a  cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the  neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had  been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.
Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

Issue one of the East Village Eye, May 1979

Ignited in part by the changes in music, art and fashion that occurred at CBGB, the East Village experienced a cultural renaissance in the 1980s that matched and even exceeded the neighborhood’s glory days in the late 1960s. The old East Village had been chronicled by the newspaper East Village Other. For the new East Village it was the East Village Eye, whose first issue hit the street in May 1979. Shepherded through good times and bad by publisher Leonard Abrams, the Eye continued through January 1987 and ultimately numbered over 70 issues.

Miller’s Memorabilia - East Village Eye

"In the meantime we agreed to forget our cares for the night. We took a little money from our savings and walked to Forty-second Street. We stopped at a photo booth in Playland (nyt)

to take our pictures, a strip of four for a quarter. We got a hotdog and papaya drink at Benedict’s,

then merged with the action.

Boys on shore leave,

prostitutes,

runaways,

abused tourists, and assorted victims of alien abduction. (mcny)

It was an urban boardwalk with Kino parlors, souvenir stands, Cuban diners, strip clubs, and late night pawnshops. (nyt)

For fifty cents one could slip inside a theater draped in stained velvet and watch foreign films with soft porn.”
(getty)

~ Patti Smith, Just Kids

Three girls on Bond Street in Brooklyn. July 1974. (Photo by Danny  Lyon / NARA)
Here Is What Brooklyn Was Like In The Summer Of 1974 (Business Insider)
[way before they came along]

Three girls on Bond Street in Brooklyn. July 1974. (Photo by Danny Lyon / NARA)

Here Is What Brooklyn Was Like In The Summer Of 1974 (Business Insider)

[way before they came along]

Save the Robots operated at 25 Avenue B—near the corner of Second  Street, a notorious heroin cop spot—as a semi-legal underground club.  Club kids, drag queens, and bar employees from other establishments  finally off work after 4 a.m. were frequent customers.
Vintage ads for downtown clubs from the 1980s (Ephemeral New York)
more on save the robots from mr. beller’s neighborhood

Save the Robots operated at 25 Avenue B—near the corner of Second Street, a notorious heroin cop spot—as a semi-legal underground club. Club kids, drag queens, and bar employees from other establishments finally off work after 4 a.m. were frequent customers.

Vintage ads for downtown clubs from the 1980s (Ephemeral New York)

more on save the robots from mr. beller’s neighborhood


Max: I’m too nostalgic. I’ll admit it.  Skippy: We graduated four months ago. What can you possibly be nostalgic for?  Max: I’m nostalgic for conversations I had yesterday. I’ve begun reminiscing  events before they even occur. I’m reminiscing this right now. I can’t  go to the bar because I’ve already looked back on it in my memory… and  I didn’t have a good time. 

to all you college graduates out there, go see this film, this is what it was like graduating in the ’90s — it’s about best friends fresh out of college and anxious about what to  do next and the endless indecisions that plague them; an ironic reality that  most of us seem to face at some point in our lives…
not much different than today or any other generations, really. but watch it for the urbane wit but shot-through with a virulent darkness that makes the tone  consistently ambiguous, nonetheless…
p.s.
saw this at cineplex odeon’s worldwide cinemas for $2. the theater would show movies right before they are available in dvd, blu-ray, netflix vhs
the theater is now part of another glass condo, of course,

Max: I’m too nostalgic. I’ll admit it.
Skippy: We graduated four months ago. What can you possibly be nostalgic for?
Max: I’m nostalgic for conversations I had yesterday. I’ve begun reminiscing events before they even occur. I’m reminiscing this right now. I can’t go to the bar because I’ve already looked back on it in my memory… and I didn’t have a good time.

to all you college graduates out there, go see this film, this is what it was like graduating in the ’90s — it’s about best friends fresh out of college and anxious about what to do next and the endless indecisions that plague them; an ironic reality that most of us seem to face at some point in our lives…

not much different than today or any other generations, really. but watch it for the urbane wit but shot-through with a virulent darkness that makes the tone consistently ambiguous, nonetheless…

p.s.

saw this at cineplex odeon’s worldwide cinemas for $2. the theater would show movies right before they are available in dvd, blu-ray, netflix vhs

the theater is now part of another glass condo, of course,

"It was a city, as John Cheever once wrote, that "was still filled  with a river light, when you heard the Benny Goodman quartets from a  radio in the corner stationery store, and when almost everybody wore a  hat." In that city, the taxicabs were all Checkers, with ample room for  your legs, and the drivers knew where Grand Central was and always  helped with the luggage. In that city, there were apartments with three  bedrooms and views of the river. You hurried across the street and your  girl was waiting for you under the Biltmore clock, with snow melting in  her hair. Cars never double-parked. Shop doors weren’t locked in the  daytime. Bus drivers still made change. All over town, cops walked the  beat and everyone knew their names. In that city, you did not smoke on  the subway. You wore galoshes in the rain. Waitresses called you honey.  You slept with windows open to the summer night.
That New York is gone now, hammered  into dust by time, progress, accident, and greed. Yes, most of us  distrust the memory of how we lived here, not so very long ago.  Nostalgia is a treacherous emotion, at once a curse against the present  and an admission of permanent resentment, never to be wholly trusted.  For many of us, looking back is simply too painful; we must confront the  unanswerable question of how we let it all happen, how the Lost City  was lost. And so most of us have trained ourselves to forget. …”
The New York We’ve Lost by Pete Hamill
(From the December 21-28, 1987 issue of  New York  Magazine)

"It was a city, as John Cheever once wrote, that "was still filled with a river light, when you heard the Benny Goodman quartets from a radio in the corner stationery store, and when almost everybody wore a hat." In that city, the taxicabs were all Checkers, with ample room for your legs, and the drivers knew where Grand Central was and always helped with the luggage. In that city, there were apartments with three bedrooms and views of the river. You hurried across the street and your girl was waiting for you under the Biltmore clock, with snow melting in her hair. Cars never double-parked. Shop doors weren’t locked in the daytime. Bus drivers still made change. All over town, cops walked the beat and everyone knew their names. In that city, you did not smoke on the subway. You wore galoshes in the rain. Waitresses called you honey. You slept with windows open to the summer night.

That New York is gone now, hammered into dust by time, progress, accident, and greed. Yes, most of us distrust the memory of how we lived here, not so very long ago. Nostalgia is a treacherous emotion, at once a curse against the present and an admission of permanent resentment, never to be wholly trusted. For many of us, looking back is simply too painful; we must confront the unanswerable question of how we let it all happen, how the Lost City was lost. And so most of us have trained ourselves to forget. …”

The New York We’ve Lost by Pete Hamill

(From the December 21-28, 1987 issue of New York Magazine)

The East Village art scene—that heady mid-eighties  era when uptown collectors elbowed out Avenue B  junkies—is about to be memorialized was memorialized by a New  Museum show. 
One of the more pointed  critics of the time recalls the worst excesses  of that art movement—and the (infinitely cooler)  neighborhood that it eclipsed.
Memories of the East Village Art Scene (NYM)

The East Village art scene—that heady mid-eighties era when uptown collectors elbowed out Avenue B junkies—is about to be memorialized was memorialized by a New Museum show.

One of the more pointed critics of the time recalls the worst excesses of that art movement—and the (infinitely cooler) neighborhood that it eclipsed.

Memories of the East Village Art Scene (NYM)