“I’ve seen the fiftieth-anniversary restoration Breathless, and it’s revelatory; the images, restored under the supervision of the film’s cinematographer, Raoul Coutard, yield up details hitherto imperceptible in the prints that were available until now, as if layers of varnish had come off to show Coutard’s own brushwork. Keeping a close eye on the timings—the brightness of each scene, each shot—he elicits a dark, contrasty, charcoal-like palette that seems to reflect the now-familiar stories of Godard’s unusual methods (they used hardly any movie lighting, even indoors; shot on the street at night with high-speed still-camera film; filmed in direct sunlight; worked mainly with a hand-held camera of the sort more often used for newsreels). The soundtrack, too, is happily crisp and clear, and, for non-Francophones, the subtitles have also been redone and made much fuller than on earlier prints. I’ve seen the film countless times but am grateful to have seen it again in this restoration; I’m not able to compare it side-by-side with other prints, but this one provided a welcome jolt of the new.”
– Richard Brody, The New Yorker

just in case you missed it this past summer, jean-luc godard’s breathless 50th anniversary restoration returns to film forum (now thru dec. 7)
[image designed by Yoko Komura]

“I’ve seen the fiftieth-anniversary restoration Breathless, and it’s revelatory; the images, restored under the supervision of the film’s cinematographer, Raoul Coutard, yield up details hitherto imperceptible in the prints that were available until now, as if layers of varnish had come off to show Coutard’s own brushwork. Keeping a close eye on the timings—the brightness of each scene, each shot—he elicits a dark, contrasty, charcoal-like palette that seems to reflect the now-familiar stories of Godard’s unusual methods (they used hardly any movie lighting, even indoors; shot on the street at night with high-speed still-camera film; filmed in direct sunlight; worked mainly with a hand-held camera of the sort more often used for newsreels). The soundtrack, too, is happily crisp and clear, and, for non-Francophones, the subtitles have also been redone and made much fuller than on earlier prints. I’ve seen the film countless times but am grateful to have seen it again in this restoration; I’m not able to compare it side-by-side with other prints, but this one provided a welcome jolt of the new.”

Richard Brody, The New Yorker

just in case you missed it this past summer, jean-luc godard’s breathless 50th anniversary restoration returns to film forum (now thru dec. 7)

[image designed by Yoko Komura]


Charles Biederman (1906 - 2004)New York #8  1939 Painted wood and glass 36 1/2 x 28 3/4 x 4 1/4 inches

Charles  Biederman: Works 1934 - 1994  November 4, 2010 – January 8, 2011at Meredith Ward Fine Art

Charles Biederman (1906 - 2004)
New York #8
1939
Painted wood and glass
36 1/2 x 28 3/4 x 4 1/4 inches

Charles Biederman: Works 1934 - 1994 
November 4, 2010 – January 8, 2011
at Meredith Ward Fine Art

[Fifth Avenue and 77th Street in New York City, winter 1905-06]
Historic House Festival: “The Moveable Feast”
(sept. 24 thru 26)

[Fifth Avenue and 77th Street in New York City, winter 1905-06]

Historic House Festival: “The Moveable Feast”

(sept. 24 thru 26)

Jack Tworkov’s ‘West 23rd,
'Abstract Expressionist New York', Museum of Modern Art, Oct.  3-April 25

For this exhibit, MoMA  is hauling out 300 works by 30 artists who worked in the titular  style—the first that the institution was around to really collect.  Almost all of the art will come from the museum’s own collection.  Well-known examples of painting, sculpture and photography—made mostly  from the 1940s to the ’60s—will be presented alongside works by more  obscure artists. Shown in 25,000 square feet of gallery space, it’s an  exhibit to dive into.
(wsj)
Jack Tworkov’s ‘West 23rd,

'Abstract Expressionist New York', Museum of Modern Art, Oct. 3-April 25

For this exhibit, MoMA is hauling out 300 works by 30 artists who worked in the titular style—the first that the institution was around to really collect. Almost all of the art will come from the museum’s own collection. Well-known examples of painting, sculpture and photography—made mostly from the 1940s to the ’60s—will be presented alongside works by more obscure artists. Shown in 25,000 square feet of gallery space, it’s an exhibit to dive into.

(wsj)